Tag: take control of your health

Autumn Foods & Health: Beginning a Transformation into Yin

Autumn is a time that provides a cool, crisp breeze in the morning that hits my face and helps me wake up. It represents a time to pick apples so long that my knuckles become scratched and chilled, but it is all worth it when I bite into the perfect, juicy, teeth-aching apple. It means growing a fuller beard for extra warmth. Early autumn stirs thoughts of family and gatherings that will take place in late autumn and early winter. It reminds me that I have to make Bon Appétit’s parsnip, carrot, and potato soup which are tasty autumn foods and remember to puree the whole thing, add more sherry, and let it sit for 1 full day (it just tastes so much better). Autumn is a wonderful time, but it takes some preparation and care to survive this seasonal change.

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Theory about Appropriate Living
The Huang Di Nei Jing (The Yellow Emperor’s Inner Canon) is one of the chief medical books of TCM written thousands of years ago. The style of the book is set up as a question & answer with the Yellow Emperor of China asking a Daoist master Qi Bo questions about many things to do with past and current life in relation to health and disease. The first call and response between the two is as follows:

In Chapter 1, the Yellow Emperor asks:

  • “I am told the people in ancient times could all survive to more than 100 years old, and they appeared to be quite healthy and strong in actions, but the people at present time are different, they are not so nimble in action when they are only 50, and what is the reason?”

Qi Bo answers:

  • “Those who knew the way of keeping good health in ancient times always kept their behavior in daily life in accordance with nature. Their behaviors in daily life were all kept in regular patterns such as their food and drink were of fixed quantity; their daily activities were all in regular times. They never overworked. In this way, they could maintain both in the body and in the spirit substantiality, and were able to live to the old age of more than 100 years.”1

The important part about the answer is to live one’s “daily life in accordance with nature.” This is important to remember as we enter the fall season or any change of season for that matter. There is a big change occurring with the earth, and one’s body needs to be in tune with those changes and one should make the appropriate choices or disease will occur.

Autumn Foods & Health

Autumn is a time where the yang/warmth of the sun begins to lessen and give way to the yin/cooler seasons of fall and winter. In autumn one must begin to store vital energy in order to make it through the winter in a healthy state. One must slow down from the sometimes frenetic activity of the summer. The movement of autumn in Chinese medicine is downward, and this is evident in the root-based vegetables that are available during that time2. These veggies reach down into the ground to acquire their energy which we consume to acquire that energy.

The importance of the seasons comes up specifically in chapter 2 of the Huang Di Nei Jing which is a classic text on Chinese medicine:

“In the 3 months of autumn, the shapes of all living things on earth become mature naturally and are ready to be harvested. In autumn, the wind is vigorous and rapid, the environment on earth is clear and bright, so during this period, one should go to bed early to stay away from the chilliness, get up early to appreciate the crisp air of autumn, keep the spirit tranquil and stable to separate oneself from the sough of autumn by means of restraining the spirit and energy internally and guard the mind against anxiety and impetuosity. In this way, one’s tranquility can still be maintained even in the sough of autumn atmosphere, and the breath of the lung can be kept even as well.”3


What foods should you eat during autumn?
One of the easiest ways to stay healthy is to get in touch with the energy of the harvest through fresh foods. It is important to transition into eating warmer, cooked foods during this time and keeping the salads and raw foods at bay until next summer.

Food in Season during Autumn:4
Veggies

  • Beets
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Collard Greens
  • Italian Parsley
  • Fennel
  • Jerusalem artichokes (a/k/a sunchokes)
  • Kale
  • Kohlrabi
  • Leeks
  • Mushrooms
  • Onions
  • Parsnips
  • Peppers
  • Potatoes
  • Pumpkins
  • Shelling Beans
  • Turnips
  • Winter Squash

Fruits

  • Apples
  • Concord grapes
  • Niagara grapes
  • Pears

Meats

  • Duck
  • Pheasant
  • Rabbit
  • Venison
  • Wild Turkey

Fish

  • Atlantic Mackerel
  • Bluefish
  • Monkfish
  • Native Oysters
  • Pacific Salmon
  • Red Snapper
  • Scallops (bay and sea)

A good guideline about what to eat during the autumn is to locate what is available at your local farmer’s market and use that as a template for building a meal that is appropriate to the season. This goes for autumn and any other season as well. Check out the NYC Harvest Calendar to figure out what is available each season.

Kale
Kale is a great ingredient for seasonal eaters as it is one of the few green vegetables that are more abundant and flavorful during autumn and winter. It can be substituted for cabbage or spinach and makes a fine side dish when blanched. Kale is a nutritionally rich food containing:

  • vitamins A, C and E
  • a substantial mineral content including manganese, iron, calcium and potassium
  • phytochemicals such as sulphoraphane (linked to cancer prevention)5

One of my most favorite fall recipes uses kale and is as follows:

 

Eggs in a Nest6
(This recipe makes dinner for a family of four, but can easily be cut in half.)

2 cups uncooked brown rice
Cook rice with 4 cups water in a covered pot for 50 minutes or in a rice cooker while other ingredients are being prepared.
Olive oil – a few tbsp
1 medium onion, chopped, and minced garlic to taste
Sauté onions and garlic in olive oil in a wide skillet until lightly golden.
Carrots, chopped
1 cup dried tomatoes
Add and sauté for a few more minutes, adding just enough water to rehydrate the tomatoes.
1 really large bunch of kale, coarsely chopped
Mix with other vegetables and cover pan for a few minutes. Uncover, stir well, then use the back of a spoon to make depressions in the cooked leaves, circling the pan like numbers on a clock.
8 eggs
Break an egg into each depression, being careful to keep yolks whole. Cover pan again and allow eggs to poach for 3 to 5 minutes. Remove from heat and serve over rice.

I like to doctor this recipe up with some hot sauce and tamari sauce.

Other Autumn Tips

  1. Carry around a sweater/sweatshirt/scarf – even if it feels warm because during autumn it is cold in the shade and warm in the sun. This is typically the season where people are still dressing like it is still summer because the sun still has warmth during the high point of the day. This drastic change in temperature without the proper protection from the environment can put your body at risk.
  2. Eat soup – this is the time of season to begin thinking about making more nourishing wholesome, all-encompassing foods like soups. Soups usually contain meats, veggies, and carbohydrates. They are a great meal in one! The temperature is also warming to the yang to prepare oneself for winter.
  3. Keep hydrated – autumn is the time of dryness. The moisture of the humid summer gives way to autumn dryness. It is important to remember this and drink tea or room temperature water to help your body remain hydrated.
  4. See your acupuncturist – winter is often the time when people catch the most head colds. Seeing your acupuncturist can shore up your protective qi and lessen or eradicate head colds during the winter.

Get out and enjoy the weather change from summer to autumn, but remember to be prepared like your local boy scout. You don’t want to be caught off guard.

By Michael Pingicer, L.Ac.

 

Call 646-504-2251 To Schedule

– – – – –

1 Wang, Bing & Wu, Nelson (trans.). The Yellow Empero’s Inner Classic. China Science & technology Press.
2 Flaws, Bob (1983). Prince Wen Hui’s Cook. Blue Poppy, Boulder, CO.
3 Wang, Bing & Wu, Nelson (trans.). The Yellow Empero’s Inner Classic. China Science & technology Press.
4 http://www.cenyc.org/site/pages/GMKT/harvestcalendar.pdf
5 http://www.eattheseasons.com/Archive/kale.htm
6 http://animalvegetablemiracle.com/EGGS%20IN%20A%20NEST.pdf

Food Remedies for Colds and Flus

Remember how your parents always bugged you about wearing a hat and sweater in cooler weather? They knew that the possibility of a Wind-Cold invasion could lead to the flu, runny or stuffy noses, body aches and fevers.

We often combat Wind invasions by wearing our hat and sweaters but what happens if that doesn’t work? What if you catch a cold and it progressively worsens?

Chinese Dietary Therapy
Food can help prevent and treat most wind invasions. Wind is considered a pathogenic source which enters at the level of the head and face and if not expelled quickly may move deeper into the throat and chest. There are two types of wind pathogens, Wind-Cold and Wind-Heat. Most colds start off as a Wind-Cold invasion and may progress into wind-heat. We want to protect and nourish the Wei Qi or Defensive qi of the body through diet, herbs and exercise. Our bodies are made of Yin and Yang energies. When these energies are balanced we are healthy. Exterior pathogens can create an imbalance of our qi. The nature of food is also yin or yang. Therefore we can use food medicinally to balance our qi. First let’s examine the signs & symptoms of two common exterior conditions and then we will explore dietary prevention and treatment options.

Grate fresh ginger into soup or boil 3 slices with water & lemon

Compare the following two lists of symptoms. You should have most of the symptoms in one category before applying a dietary change. If you have conflicting symptoms, ask your acupuncturist for clarification. Don’t forget that acupuncture is effective to kick a cold or flu!

Wind-Cold Symptoms: Headache, runny nose with clear discharge, neck and shoulder aches, aversion to cold, a white tongue coating.

Special Dietary Consideration: If you are suffering from a Wind-Cold Invasion it is best to stick with foods whose qi qualities are warming, neutral and hot foods.

Wind-Heat Symptoms:
Sore throat, headache, cough, fever or elevated body temperature, body aches, little or no sweat, runny or stuffy nose with yellow discharge, a red tongue body w/ yellow coating. If the heat is very deep it may cause nausea or vomiting, depressed appetite, abdominal distention, chills and fever, heavy sweating, irritability, strong thirst.

Special Dietary Consideration: If you are suffering from a Wind-Heat Invasion it is best to stick with foods whose qi quality is neutral and cooling (try to avoid too many cold foods because they can damage your qi).

Basic Dietary Considerations for Wind-Cold and Wind-Heat Invasions:
While ill, it is best to eat light, easy to digest foods like soups, veggies, rice and rice noodles. Avoid eating lots of cold foods like salads, cold sandwiches, chilled drinks, ice pops, and soy ice cream. Also avoid foods that may cause Dampness in the body. Dampness is heavy in nature, obstructs Defensive qi and contributes to phlegm production. Therefore, stay away from foods that are damp in nature such as dairy products, fried foods, greasy foods, foods high in fat and alcohol. (Stir fry is usually OK as long you cook with a small amount of oil). Raw foods also contribute to cold and dampness. Salads, fruits and fruit juices should be taken in moderation or are to be completely avoided. Be aware that most chickens and meat contain antibiotics. It is best to eat organic chickens and meats because they are not fed antibiotics. The more antibiotics we consume the faster our body becomes immune to them. Antibiotics are also seen as a cause of dampness and cold in the body and when overused can cause qi imbalances which may manifest as fatigue, a susceptibility to more bacterial infections, yeast infections and more.


Prevention and Treatment of Wind-Cold Invasion:
Generally, I recommended foods to promote perspiration which forces out the wind toxin such as: ginger, scallion, chilies, coriander, cabbage. Avoid vinegar because it contracts the pores.

Teas – In prevention and treatment of a simple Wind-Cold headache try Green tea mixed with Peppermint tea. Fresh Ginger tea with a bit of brown sugar is good when you have the other symptoms as well.

Breakfast Food Example – Hot oats with local, raw honey (or pure maple syrup) and powdered cinnamon. Oats are warm and easy to digest, honey is sweet, nourishes body fluids and cinnamon is warm, pungent and unblocks channels for the upper body aches.

Soups – Miso Soup with Scallions – The fermented miso (soy paste) is sweet, salty and neutral. It strengthens the Stomach qi and detoxifies which will help dispel wind-cold and the scallions are warming and pungent which promotes sweating to relieve the exterior wind-cold invasion.Simply bring 2-3 cups of filtered or spring water to a boil. Add 2 tablespoons of miso paste, let dissolve. Cook for 10 minutes on low flame. Taste. If the flavor is too strong, add some water, vegetable or chicken broth. Chop the scallions and sprinkle about a teaspoon on top of your miso soup in the bowl. Avoid adding seaweed to this recipe, it is cold in nature.

Chicken Soup
Ingredients:

  • 3 Leeks thinly slice
  • 2-3 Tablespoons Olive oil
  • 6-8 cups filtered or spring water
  • 1 whole organic, antibiotic free chicken or chicken parts
  • 2 cups rice or rice noodles
  • Veggies for Wind-Cold or Heat as listed below
  • ½-1 teaspoon per serving of freshly grated ginger
  • 3-5 cloves of garlic, minced

Take 3 thin leeks, wash. Thinly slice the whites. Add 2-3 tablespoons of Olive oil to the bottom of a stock pot and turn flame on medium. When oil is warm, stir in leeks until they are lightly covered with oil. Lower flame and cover the pot to let leeks “sweat” for 10 minutes, occasionally stirring. Add in the garlic and saute for 2 minutes. Add 6-8 cups of water to the leeks. Add one washed organic chicken or 1 pound of organic chicken parts with bones. Place in stock pot. Cover with water. Boil for one hour. Cook 2 cups of unpolished white rice (20 minutes) or jasmine rice (10 minutes). Prepare freshly grated ginger, about 1 tablespoon. Turn down heat to let the water and fat settle. Scoop out or strain fat. Remove chicken from stock. You may prepare and add any of these warming veggies: squash, green bean, sweet potato, kale. Add veggies to a simmering stock for 10-15 minutes (or longer if using sweet potatoes). While the veggies are cooking, chop the chicken into spoon size pieces and add to the stock. After all the chicken is back in the stockpot, turn off the flame. Place rice and a ½ -1 teaspoon of grated ginger and desired amount of rice into a bowl and ladle soup over it. You can add a cinnamon stick or a touch of grated cinnamon to each bowl as well. To induce more sweating or clear the sinuses you can add some hot chili sauce to your soup. This soup does take time to make. You may want to make those soup and freeze a few containers of it so that when you are ill and fatigued you can simply warm it up and eat it.

Garlic, cinnamon, ginger and raw, local honey all have antibiotic and anti-viral effects.


Prevention and Treatment of Wind-Heat: Generally avoid pungent tasting foods and foods that have a very warm or hot nature such as scallions, chilies, wine and keep your intake light. Ginger can also be used in this case but avoid dried ginger because it is too hot and may aggravate this condition. It is great to help stop cough and nausea but do not overuse because it is warming. If you have a Wind-Heat Invasion you should also see your practitioner of Oriental Medicine for herbs and other treatments.

Teas – Peppermint and/or Chrysanthemum tea with local, raw honey. These herbs dispel heat and the honey nourishes Yin body fluids that may become damaged by heat. Peppermint is also used for sinus congestion.

Breakfast Food Example – Warm tea and Amaranth flakes cereal with unsweetened almond milk. You may add almonds, walnuts and or honey to help stop coughing.

Soup – We are going to use the same basic chicken soup recipe as above except you will not use cinnamon or chiles, or those vegetables. Instead you can use cooling veggies: bok choy, broccoli, cauliflower, celery, corn, mushroom, spinach, swiss chard, turnip, zucchini, bamboo shoots, button mushroom, carrot, dandelion greens, potato.

The Health Benefits of Laughter Therapy

It is more than six years now since the first “Laughter Club” was set up. There is a growing demand for such clubs in India and abroad. Almost everyday more and more people are joining Laughter Clubs and are reaping its benefits. One of the benefits is that laughter puts the members in a positive frame of mind and gradually makes them positive thinkers. People suffering from a variety of stress-related diseases have benefited in some way or another. But we don’t claim that long-standing ailments have been cured by laughter therapy. Laughter is more of a supplementary and preventive therapy.

Anti Stress: Laughter is one of the finest, most economical and easy ways to reduce stress. Laughter is one of the best muscle relaxants. Laughter expands blood vessels and sends more blood to the extremities and other muscles all over the body. A good bout of laughter also reduces the levels of stress hormones epinephrine and cortisol. It is used as a form of dynamic meditation or relaxation. For meditation one has to put in a concerted effort to completely detach oneself, on mental and emotional levels, from one’s own feelings and thought processes, as well as from the physical world to prevent distractions. While laughing we do not have any conscious thought process and all our senses naturally and effortlessly combine in a moment of harmony to give joy, peace and relaxation. In other types of meditation you need to concentrate a lot to take your mind away from distracting thoughts, which is easier said than done. Therefore, laughter is, if I may say so, the easiest form of meditation and one which brings you instant relaxation.

Strengthens the Immune System: The immune system plays an important role in maintaining good health by keeping away infections, allergies and cancers. It has been proven by psychoneuroimmunologists that negative emotions like anxiety, depression or anger weaken the immune system of the body, thereby reducing its fighting capacity against infections. According to Dr. Lee S. Berk from Loma Linda University, California, laughter helps to increase the count of natural killer cells (NK cells – a type of white cell) and also raises the antibody levels. Researchers have found that after laughter therapy there is an increase in antibodies (Immunoglobulin A) in the mucous of the nose and respiratory passages, which is believed to have a protective capacity against some viruses, bacteria and other micro organisms. Many members of Laughter Clubs have noticed that their frequency of common colds, sore throats and chest infections has decreased. The effect of laughter on the immune system is considered to be very significant with regard to deadly disease like AIDS and cancer by improving quality of life.

Aerobic Exercise: The one benefit almost everybody experiences is a sense of well-being. After 15 minutes of laughter in the morning, they feel fresh throughout the day. There is no medicine like laughter which gives you such an instant result. The reason for the sense of well-being is that you inhale more oxygen while laughing. Laughter can be compared to any aerobic exercises except you don’t have to wear fancy shoes or clothes. You don’t need to sweat hard on the jogging tracks. According to Dr. William Fry from Stanford University, one minute of laughter is equal to 10 minutes on the rowing machine. Laughter stimulates heart and blood circulation like aerobic exercise. Laughter exercise is suited for sedentary people and those who are confined to a bed or wheelchair.

Depression, anxiety and psychosomatic disorders: The stress and strain of modern life are taking a heavy toll of the human mind and body. Mind-related diseases like anxiety, depression, nervous breakdowns and sleeplessness are on the rise. Laughter has benefited many people who were on heavy anti-depressant pills and tranquilizers. Now they are getting better sleep and their depression has reduced. People with suicidal tendencies have started living with more hope.

High Blood Pressure and Heart disease: There are a number of causes for high blood pressure and heart disease like heredity, obesity, smoking and excessive intake of saturated fats. But stress is one of the major factors. Laughter definitely helps to control blood pressure by reducing the release of stress-related hormones and bringing relaxation.

© Used with Permission

Dr. Mandan Kataria
http://www.laughteryoga.org
Mumbai, INDIA. 2003.
Phone : +91-22-26316426
E-Mail : laugh@laughteryoga.org

 

Needle-Free Acupuncture Treating Your Children with Tui Na Massage & Shoni Shin

Learn About the Benefits of Needle-free Acupuncture for Babies & Children, Tui Na Massage & Shoni Shin TreatmentAn Interview with Melanie Katin, L.Ac., Professor and Clinician of Pediatric Chinese Medicine with Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac., Creator of HealthyStuff U.com

More parents are using natural health treatments for their kids.
More parents are using natural health treatments for their kids.

JA: A slew of positive media reports about the efficacy of acupuncture and tui na massage for kids is popularising parental interest in this natural treatment. Yet, many parents remain hesitant to bring kids in for acupuncture because babies, toddlers, kids and even the parents themselves may be frightened of needles. With that, how does your pediatric practice stay so busy?

MK: When people learn that I am a pediatric acupuncturist, they open their eyes wide when inquiring if I really use needles on children. The answer is yes, depending on a combination of the health issue, the parents’ consent, and the child’s willingness. However, in the pediatric clinic, there are several other methods of treatment beyond needling that are comfortable for the child, and easy to teach parents so that they can continue treatments at home, when necessary.

JA: Chinese medicine uses medical massage as a stand-alone, or as an adjunctive therapy to acupuncture. How well do children take to needle-free therapies?

Infants and babies respond quickly to Chinese medical massage.

MK: In Chinese medicine, massage is called Tui Na (twee-naa). For infants and small children under 6, this is always the first line of treatment in my office.  One of the best things about the health of children is their ability to heal quickly. They generally have rapid shifting of symptoms, however intense they may seem at the moment.

In Chinese medicine, we say that infants, babies and toddlers are yang in nature, meaning that they grow and learn fast, get sick quickly, with fast resolution of their illness, and tend to have more hot, feverish illnesses.  When children are sick, there is disorder in their Qi (chee), and it is part of the goal of my treatments to restore order to the qi using gentle and tolerable treatments. The Qi is superficial, and is easily accessed on the skin, which is why massage is one of the best tools to use for children.

JA: How does pediatric tui-na massage differ from therapeutic massage for grown-ups?

MK: Pediatric tui na massage is different from standard adult massage in many ways. First, is the fact that warm water is used as the substrate, instead of oil or creams.  Adult massage employs oils because they help sedate and calm during the massage. But because children have yang tendencies, sedating or calming them with oils and creams is usually contraindicated. We want their discomfort to move out of their bodies rapidly, therefore water allows for fast hand motions during the massage without creating any friction on the skin, which may be uncomfortable.

Also different from adult massage are the techniques. The hand movements are specific to the goal of treatment: for instance, for a child experiencing a cough, we would administer tui na massage the sternum or breastplate in a downward direction only, to encourage the body to stop having the upward movement of the cough. If a child is experiencing constipation, the abdominal massage is done in a clockwise direction, because the large intestine moves in this direction, and the massage helps direct the peristalsis. Conversely, for a child with diarrhea, we would massage in a counter-clockwise direction.

JA: Can parents learn tui-na massage techniques to continue therapy at home with their children?

Tui-na massage is easy to learn and to use at home.

MK: Yes. Since the techniques are very easy to learn, I ensure that the parents have a good grasp on how to do 2-3 techniques so that they can continue the treatments at home. With most illnesses it is important that the treatment be performed sometimes several times a day, so caregiver involvement is essential.

JA: It always amazes me how effective tui-na massage is when I use it with my son at home. And, yes, we’ve noticed that if we don’t use the techniques several times per day the treatments are not successful.  We commit the time to his health, which isn’t hard, because the tui-na only takes a few minutes each time.  My son and I love the bonding time that massage creates for us. Which other needle-free methods do you use?

Shoni-shin tools for used in pediatric care do not cause pain.

MT: A second modality we use is called Shoni Shin. This is a technique of gently tapping and scraping the skin with small instruments. There are specific shoni shin tools that are usually made from copper or stainless steel.  This technique is used both as a preventative measure by maintaining the flow of qi to stay consistent when the child is healthy, but also as a way to inform the neurological system of the proper flow when the child is ill.

JA: When I was searching for stock photos to accompany this interview, my son peeked at my computer screen as I found the photo below, of a boy receiving shoni-shin.  He recognized the shoni-shin tools and exclaimed, “That boy is getting massage, mommy”!

Kids love shoni-shin tools!

MT: Children love shoni shin tools! Especially the roller, which is always the first one to be picked up and played with. It is important that the children become comfortable with the tools, and we create a game with them during the treatment. Often, slightly older children will make up stories about each tool. However, I have found that children who have had many experiences with surgeries or hospital visits are wary of shiny, strange looking objects coming near their skin. For these wee ones, I have used more recognizable household items, such as buttons, spoons, sea glass or seashells: in other words, friendly and familiar.

JA: That is brilliant. And these are items which kids are likely familiar with. I have also used a coin as a tool. Shoni-shin has a neat history. Please tell us about that.

The shoni-shin pine brush tool feels wonderful

MK: Shoni shin was a technique developed in Japan in the 17th century, and more recently popularized in modern clinics. In Japan, the Chinese medical clinics will raise a flag of a different animal each month, around the full moon. This signals parents in the neighborhood that it is time to bring in the children for their monthly wellness visits for shoni shin.  I strongly encourage parents to consider bringing their kids in to see me when they are not currently sick to receive shoni shin. This way, they can meet me, learn about shoni shin and massage, and develop a level of comfort at my office, so that when they are actually sick and fussy, they will not have the added fear of something and someone new, but will be familiar with the procedure.

JA: And monthly visits can help strengthen kid’s immune systems and refresh the parents memory about techniques to use, along with learning new ones.

So, what about acupuncture for kids? When do you use needles?

Acupuncture needles used on kids are usually inserted, stimulated and removed with lighting speed by a skilled practitioner.

MK: It is not always necessary to needle small children, because they can benefit greatly from the two modalities described here. However, for some instances, neither tui na nor shoni shin can be employed well, either due to intolerance of touch, or for those little ones who have just learned how to walk, and just cannot sit still. For these cases, sometimes a couple needles are faster and easier to use.

Once you find a competent pediatric specialist, you should discover that your child may not even notice that they have been needled. One way I have discovered to avert the fear aspect of needles is to call them something else! One little 3-year old I know calls them “piques,” which sounds a lot like “peek,” so this is usually my word of choice, to remind the child of a game of peek-a-boo.

JA:  I love it! My son is still nervous to receive acupuncture, but each time after I treat him, he always looks me right in the eyes and sincerely thanks me. I bet your patients and their parents are grateful too. We are certainly grateful when we come to see you! How can parents outside of the New York City area find a practitioner of Chinese medicine who specializes in pediatrics?

Shoni-shin on the inner arm helps to calm and relax children.
Shoni-shin on the inner arm helps to calm and relax children.

MK: My advice on how to find a practitioner in your area is to search a couple of online resources, both www.nccaom.org, which is the national certification agency for all licensed practitioners of Chinese medicine, and also www.acufinder.com. Both of these will yield practitioners in your area. Another suggestion is to see if there is a local Chinese medical school in your area. They might have a low-cost clinic where your child can be treated, or have alumni information available. Once you’ve found a few practitioners, start calling and ask if they have experience treating children. They might be able to point you in the right direction if they are not able to help you directly.

JA: I also send people to www.tcmdirectory.com.  Thank you so much for all of this valuable information about Chinese medicine for kids. I hope it is useful for parents!

Melanie Katin, L.Ac. is a licensed acupuncturist and herbalist in NYC. She has been specializing in the care of children for 8 years in her private practice, and leads the pediatric clinic at Pacific College of Oriental Medicine’s NYC campus. For further information, or to make an appointment with Melanie, visit her website: www.melaniekatin.com

What are the Best Gluten Free Cookbooks & Recipe Websites?

Dear Professor Juliette,

A patient of my acupuncture practice believes she’s gluten intolerant or possibly allergic and she’s noticed her son is feeling a lot better now that he’s not eating gluten either. They are looking for the best gluten-free cookbooks and recipe website info and resources and I knew you’d be the one to ask  🙂

Thanks,

Picara, NYC

 

Dear Picara,

How lovely of you to research gluten-free resources for your patient! Gluten-free diets may seem daunting at first, but in a short amount of time it becomes easier and more fun to cook. Gluten-free diets lead to much healthier, happier lives for scores of children and adults. I’ve witnessed amazing health transformations in many of my patients, in myself and in my own son thanks to a gluten-free diet such as; improved digestion, healthy and rapid weight loss, clearer and more focused thinking, elimination of daytime fatigue, blood sugar regulation, reduced or eliminated moodiness and stress levels, improved behavior in children, improved fertility, reduced or eliminated seasonal allergies/rhinitis, eczema, reduced asthma symptoms, reduced symptoms of other inflammatory diseases, and more.

It is important to note that not all gluten-free foods, gluten-free cookbooks, products or recipes are healthy just because they are labeled “gluten-free”. We eaters must remain aware of our food choices. There are so many gluten-free cookbooks and recipes websites out there that a quick Google search will turn up pages of results, so encourage your patient to do more research on her own. Below you will see a short list of some of my favorite resources.

Eat Well,

“Professor” Juliette

It is important to first learn the foods to avoid when eating a gluten-free diet.

The Celiac Disease Foundation website offers exhaustive resources listing foods, drinks, alcoholic beverages, and condiments to avoid.

Celiac.com also offers this list of foods to avoid along with other support materials.

The Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network created this handy PDF “How to Read A Label for a Wheat Free Diet“. This handout is a start because wheat, along with other foods, contains gluten. This only contains instructions for wheat free diets, so there are plenty of other gluten products to watch for.

Gluten Free Cook Books (just to name a few)

Gluten-Free Girl: How I Found the Food That Loves Me Back…And How You Can Too

Gluten-Free Girl and the Chef

The G-Free Diet: A Gluten-Free Survival Guide

Gluten-Free, Hassle Free: A Simple, Sane, Dietitian-Approved Program for Eating Your Way Back To Health

Gluten-Free Diet: A Comprehensive Resource Guide- Expanded and Revised Edition

For special treats: BabyCakes: Vegan, (Mostly) Gluten-Free, and (Mostly) Sugar-Free Recipes from New York’s Most Talked-About Bakery

Gluten Free Magazines 

Living Without

Delight Gluten Free Magazine

Gluten Free Websites

http://www.allergicliving.com/

http://www.glutenfreecookingschool.com/

http://glutenfreegirl.com/  (and be sure to visit her Links page for more resources)

Food Allergy Support

Allergic Girl: Adventures in Living Well with Food Allergies 

One Of The Gang: Nurturing the Souls of Children with Food Allergies

AllergyMoms Website

Kids With Food Allergies Foundation

 

 

Stress, Anxiety, & Panic Attack Relief with Acupuncture & Herbs

Woman Sitting with Tea Cup

Anxiety and Panic Attack Treatments with acupuncture and Chinese herbs are fast acting, safe, effective. Chinese medicine recognizes that a variety of causes and conditions continually arise in life which shift our energy. Because of these shifts we may not feel happy all the time, nor are we expected to according to the Chinese medical perspective.

In fact, the person in optimal health will experience the full range of emotions, but without getting stuck in any one emotional state. When stress, anxiety and panic attacks get in the way of life, patients need fast acting treatments. Acupuncture and Chinese herbs offer a natural, safe and effective method of treatment.

In clinical practice, the patients I treat recover quickly from stress, anxiety and panic attack treatments. When I treat people with stress and emotional disorders using acupuncture and Chinese herbs I tailor an individualized and focused treatment strategy to the specific imbalances of each person.

Ready to release the anxiety? Call 646-504-2251 for an appointment.

I gently place acupuncture needles in the body to open up blockages in energy flow, and to support systems that are weak or out of balance with the rest of the body. My approach allows the body to heal itself naturally, and the tailored treatment provides effective. Treatment also aims to resolve the problems from the root cause, for lasting relief. I also teach home care stress reduction techniques.

“After my second appointment with Juliette I never suffered from another anxiety attack again, and it has now been almost a year since I first visited her. I am so grateful to Juliette. I admit I went into this a little skeptical but Juliette Aiyana is so knowledgeable and easy to talk to, as soon as I met her I was immediately glad I made the appointment. Each week I would look forward to my appointment, it was such a relaxing experience. I have such faith in Juliette that I have referred her to friends with various ailments who have also had great results with her. I highly recommend Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac. without reservations.” – Christine READ MORE PATIENT ENDORSEMENTS HERE

 

 Many people are not aware that when stress builds up in their system they experience physical or emotional symptoms. Some symptoms of stress are heart palpitations, muscle tension, headaches, fatigue, or problems with digestion, sleep, memory, or motivation. Sometimes stress or a traumatic event leads to general anxiety or panic attacks.

 

Stress, Anxiety & Emotions

 Emotions only cause imbalance if they are extreme, or if the patient holds on to them for long periods of time. If a person’s body experiences symptoms of imbalance, it means the energy flow is either blocked, deficient, or out of balance. Both physical and emotional wellness depends on a smooth flow of energy throughout the body. Acupuncture and Chinese herbs balance energy by harmonizing the flow the energy, the result of which is smooth flow and thereby reduces and/or eliminates stress, anxiety and panic attacks.

One way to achieve emotional balance is through treatment based on the Chinese Five Element system. Each of the five systems is interrelated, and the health of each one depends on balance between all of them. The five elements are fire, water, wood, metal and earth. Within the elemental relationships, each emotion relates to a specific organ. The five emotions are joy which affects the heart energy, fear/fright which affects the kidney energy, sadness/grief which affect the lung energy, anger/frustration which affects the liver energy, and worry/over-thinking which affects the spleen energy.

Stress, Anxiety & Pain

Physically, stress has several effects on the body. The main problem it causes is stuck or blocked energy, also known as stagnation. When symptoms appear, it signals that energy in one or more pathway is blocked. Some symptoms of qi stagnation are neck and back pain, fatigue, PMS, menstrual cramps or infertility. Over time symptoms become more severe and spread to other systems in the body. Treatment with acupuncture and Chinese herbs will resolve the cause of energetic disharmony to heal the physical symptoms and prevent future disease.

At-Home Stress Relief

 To “wash” your body and mind clean of stress and less than desirable experiences, emotions and events, try the following tips to help bring harmony back to your physical and emotional self, by smoothing out energy flow:

  1. Sitting in a comfortable position, close your eyes and visualize sitting by stream of water flowing gently by. When thoughts come into your head, they are part of the stream, just flowing by you. Allow yourself to consider the thought and then let it go on its way down the stream, not getting caught or lingering too long in your mind.
  2. Breath slowly and deeply. On the inhale, fill your lungs, chest, and belly completely with fresh clean air. On the exhale, release out all the air, along with the tension and built up thoughts and stresses from the day. Oxygen will circulate throughout the lungs and entire body, opening clogged areas and releasing tension from your mind and muscles. Many times during the day we don’t realize how shallowly we have been breathing.
  3. Firmly brush your limbs off, from the trunk of your body outwards. Start at the shoulders and brush out to fingertips, and past them, as if brushing a thick dust off each sleeve. Then, sitting with your legs straight out in front of you, start at the hips and brush all the way down to feet. Energetically, this releases negative or stagnated energy, and refreshes the natural balance of the body, enhancing circulation and washing impurities out of body and mind.

Acupuncture facial rejuvenation

Try Acupuncture & Herbs for Panic Attack Treatments.

It Works!

 

Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac., Herbalist, Author

What is Qi?

Qi

What is Qi?

Is Qi energy? Those who are fatigued, or always tired, will be particularly interested in Chinese Medicine’s views on qi.

This is one of the most common questions Americans ask about Chinese Medicine, and not an easy one to answer. Qi (pronounced “chee” and sometimes spelled ‘chi’) is possibly the most essential and the most controversial aspect of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Biomedicine often feels it can quite easily dismiss parts or all of TCM by maintaining that modern science cannot verify the existence of qi. The false idea that qi is an ‘energy’ like electricity has worsened this controversy.

Is Qi Energy?

Some TCM practitioners say qi is ‘energy.’ This is not too bad of an explanation. But don’t go away thinking we believe there are electrical circuits running through your body! Some scholars (D.E. Kendall, and Paul Unschuld) maintain that the idea of qi as ‘energy’ was a mistranslation from the Chinese.

Then What is It?

In terms of basic TCM ontology (“what exists”), Qi is one of the four basic constituents of the body:

Yin Blood Qi Yang
< — Substance Function — >
< — Cold Hot — >

Consider this convenient car-engine analogy: Yin is water from the radiator to cool the engine, blood is oil, qi is the force that moves the pistons, and the engine can be said to be in a yang state when operating. Perhaps the explosion itself is yang, while the force of the explosion is qi. We can also say that the gas contains a qi that has yet to be utilized.

(In the actual chinese character for the word, qi is the steam rising from a cooking pot of rice. I hope that explanation made sense to ancient Chinese, because it doesn’t make much to me! To be fair to the ancient chinese, we can think of the steam coming from the rice as being less substantial, more yang than the rice itself, but still…)

What Happens Without Qi?

Another way to understand things is by their absence (darkness is defined as the absence of light). Without sufficient qi,

  • your digestive system cannot break down food or transport nutrients to the rest of your body
  • you become easily fatigued and are always tired
  • you lose your appetite
  • your limbs are heavy
  • you might wake up frequently at night because you need to urinate
  • academic/organizing thought is difficult or impossible
  • everything is overwhelming (you cannot ‘digest’ what is going on)
  • you tend to worry (the emotional component – TCM is a holistic medicine that does not separate body and mind)

How Do I Get More Qi?

  • The proper diet goes a long way. TCM dietary principles are too complex to cover here (I must say though that it is surprising to many patients, perhaps because vegetarianism is thought to be synonymous with alternative medicine, that TCM advocates eating meat and mostly cooked foods).
  • Herbs that increase the qi include ginseng, and codonopsis.
  • Avoid activities that drain the qi – Be sensible about your energy expenditure by living a balanced life; don’t be too sedentary or too active. If you are a couch potato, your qi can’t flow without exercise. If you are a type-A personality, relax and don’t use yourself up too early in life – you may live to regret it!
by Brian B. Carter, MS, LAc. Reprinted with permission by the author
Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac., Herbalist, Author, Creator of HealthyStuffU.com
Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs
32 Union Square East, Suite 615N
New York, NY 10003
(646) 504.2251

 

How To Prepare for a Doctor’s Visit

Have you ever been a player in the following scenario?

You have a 9:30 a.m. appointment at the doctor’s office. You arrive at 9:25 a.m., sign in, sit down, read back issues of People Magazine, check your watch, note that it is now 9:45 a.m., pick up a copy of Reader’s Digest, read, check watch, now it’s 10:10 a.m. Just as you reach for Mechanics Illustrated, the nurse opens the door to the inner sanctum of examining rooms, and calls your name. A quick glance at your watch shows that it is now 10:30 a.m. The nurse takes your blood pressure, but does not tell you what it is, takes your pulse, but does not tell you what it is, and announces that the doctor will be in shortly. You discover that shortly means anytime between 15 and 45 minutes. Finally, the doctor arrives in the room, asks what ails you as he listens to your heart, asks you to take deep breaths, maybe looks in your throat and ears if your complaint is cold or flu related. Out comes the prescription pad, and the doctor exits.

Hey wait a minute!! What’s up with this? Do I have the flu? A cold? Pneumonia? How is my blood pressure? What does this medicine do for me? Does it have side effects?

 

I have been struggling with several symptoms for +10 years. After many depressing visits to conventional doctors I decided to take my health in my hands and scheduled and appointment with Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac., Herbalist in her private practice, Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs, NYC. I was sensitive and unsure of what to expect. Juliette was extremely positive and helpful. She assisted me in finding several new doctors and specialists, which have turned out to be amazing thus far. She also did a bit of massage, acupuncture therapy and suggested a few supplements. -V.V. Age 26     Read More From Juliette Aiyana’s Patients HERE.

 

Or the doctor tells you he needs more tests so he orders an EKG or and echocardiogram, or a stress test or an MRI and writes up a prescription for blood work, and then he exits. Hey, wait a minute! What’s up with this? Am I a candidate for a stroke? How long do I have to live? What is my blood pressure? And so on…

 

Problem is too often we have questions that pop up in our minds after the doctor has left the room.

So, how can you prepare yourself for that visit to the doctor and keep the white coat from flying out the door before you’ve had a chance to get answers to your questions?

Here’s how:

  1. Write down all the symptoms that brought you to the doctor. If you have a computer, check out www.webmd.com, www.mayoclinic.com ,  www.discoveryhealth.com, and www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/encyclopedia.html and look up these symptoms for yourself so that when you see the doctor you already have an idea of what is happening to you.
  2. Write down a list of all medications, vitamins, and herbs and the dosages of each, that you are taking.
  3. Read the lists to your doctor. If he is inattentive, stop reading and ask him to listen. Be bold; it’s your health and, besides, you are paying for his time and his attention.
  4. Let him know that you have done research on these symptoms and after the doctor examines you, ask him to explain the reason for each of your symptoms. Take notes of what the doctor tells you. Ask him to slow down if necessary so that you get everything down. That alone will keep him in the room longer than he might usually stay. But he will also realize that you are concerned enough about your own health to take this extra measure.
  5. Ask if any of the symptoms are related to drugs or drug interactions. Take notes.
  6. If he prescribes tests, ask what the tests will or will not reveal. Take notes.
  7. If he prescribes medication, ask if the medication has any side effects or interactions with the drugs you are presently taking. Take notes.
  8. If the doctor gives you a diagnosis and or a treatment plan, write it down!
  9. Ask what reactions you need to be aware of and how long it will take for you to feel better.
  10. If the doctor schedules a follow-up visit, ask what he will do and/or what information he will provide to you in that visit.
  11. After all is said and done, if you are not feeling better, if the tests, meds, and treatment plan do not seem to work, or if you have any doubts or concerns about the efficacy of any of the doctor’s diagnosis and prognosis, then GET A SECOND OPINION!

Tell your doctor that you are getting a second opinion and request a copy of everything that is in your folder to give to the other doctor.

 

Need Natural Treatment?

Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac., Herbalist, Author, Creator of HealthyStuffU.com
Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs
32 Union Square East, Suite 615N
New York, NY 10003
(646) 504.2251

 

Call 646-504-2251 To Schedule

Natural Support for Hashimoto’s Thyroid Disease with Acupuncture, Chinese Herbs, Food, Vitamins and Self-Care

How Acupuncture, Chinese Medicine, Diet, Exercise and Supplements
Can Help Manage This Auto-Immune Disorder

Stay warm!

Hashimoto’s disease effects women eight times more often than men. Clinically, the thyroid is enlarged, accompanied by hypothyroidism. The typical medical treatment is lifelong administration of a thyroid hormone.

Patients diagnosed with Hashimoto’s complain that they are extremely fatigued, suffer from a cold body, many have chronic joint pain or inflammation; sometimes they even have numbness and tingling in the hands and feet. Some present with allergies to food such as wheat or airborne allergens. In my practice, it seems the severity of complicating symptoms exacerbate with age.

How Can Chinese Medicine Help You?

Chinese Medicine treats the root cause of disharmony in your body. During the first visit with your practitioner, she will take an extensive health history and use techniques called Tongue Diagnosis and Pulse Diagnosis. She will connect all of the information she has gathered into a “pattern differentiation”.

Basically, what that means is she finds your unique pattern of energetic disharmony and treats that instead of administering one cookbook treatment for every patient with the same disease.

It is said in Chinese Medicine, “Same Disease, Different Treatment. Different Disease, Same Treatment”. In other words, your treatment is based upon specific Chinese medical methodology to create an individualized treatment plan for each patient. Chinese Medicine works so effectively because your practitioner acknowledges that you are not merely your disease.

So unlike western medicine which gives all Hashimoto’s patients the same treatment, practitioners of Chinese medicine will design a unique Chinese herbal medicine and acupuncture treatment protocol especially for you.

How Many Treatments Will You Need?

Treatments for auto-immune disorders are ongoing. At first you may go to your practitioner every week for about 3 months. Then you and your practitioner will decide the best treatment plan for you.

Auto-immune disorders are chronic; therefore, acupuncture and Chinese herbal therapies can be used to support your health and energy throughout your life especially in times of stress.

I teach my patients the self care techniques listed below so that we can create a healing partnership and so they can take care of themselves on a daily basis.

 

Call Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs in NYC for an appointment: 646-504-2251

Not in NYC? Schedule a Skype Wellness Consultation: 646-504-2251

 

Self-Care Techniques and Home Remedies For Patients with Hashimoto’s Thyroid Disease:

  1. Diet Adjustments
    Eat cooked leafy greens, black beans, yellow squash, meat and meat broths for blood vacuity. Patients with blood vacuity are often cold, experience fatigue, have dry skin, hair and nails and possible scant menstruation, skipped, late or missed periods.

    Essential fatty acids reduce inflammation

    Therefore blood supplementation is important for Hashimoto’s patients. Eat almonds, walnuts, sunflower seeds and avocado for essential fatty acids which reduce joint inflammation and are shown to level out blood glucose levels. Avoid white refined flour and sugars. Eat whole grains and rice instead.  Special attention should be paid to your Spleen Qi. The Spleen produces qi, blood and body fluids essential to health.

  2. Supplements
    Take a complete whole foods based multi-vitamin daily and a Calcium- Magnesium blend the ratio of which should be two times the amount of Calcium to Magnesium. Choose the bio-avilable form of calcium; citrate or citrate/malate.  Essential Fatty Acids (EFA’s) found in fish oils especially Omega 3’s reduce joint inflammation. EFA’s can be found in flax seed oil, hemp seed oil and evening primrose oil, fatty fish oils, nuts, seeds and avocado. Vitamin D3 aids thyroid function. Selenium level are usually extremely low for patient with thyroid dysfunction yet it is important for thyroid health.   Join our e-mail list to gain access to 15% all supplements via our online ordering system, wellevate, every time you order.
  3. Exercise Regularly
    If you feel more energized after exercise keep it up, but if you feel drained try a different form of exercise which consume less energy like simply walking everyday. Exercise will help you feel warmer and reduces stress. Yoga, tai-chi and qi-gong build energy and help many people feel relaxed and centered. In the case of my 25 year old patient, she can work out several times a week, and feel energetic after. But when she stops her routine, fatigue worsens, and it is hard for her to get back into the routine because of the increased fatigue. So maintain a regular program even if that simply means you walk 20 minutes a day.
  4. Dress Warmly
  5. Reduce Stress
    Keep your immune system strong by managing stress. Stress creates over-thinking and worry depleting the Spleen qi. The Spleen transforms and transports food energy into qi, blood and body fluids necessary for balance. Anger, resentment, unfulfilled desires and emotional depression can further stagnate Liver Qi energy. The Liver is responsible for the smooth flow of energy for the whole body so it is important to keep it healthy. Expressing feelings in discussions and in writing can be very helpful. Avoid people who usurp your energy. Strengthen your support system of friends and family. Avoid overworking.
    Get enough sleep. Some people find that mediation or prayer is helpful or qi cultivation/relaxation exercises such as yoga, tai chi or qi gong. Seek professional care from a therapist or support group if needed. Make choices that nourish your spirit.
  6. Acupuncture and Chinese Herbal Medicine. TCM offers herbs which help to warm the body, reduce or eliminate pain, and increase energy.  Acupuncture treats pain, relaxes the mind and body and reduces stress.

Special Note: Women who take thyroid medication have a higher incidence of Osteoporosis. That is why it is very important for them to take a calcium supplement 500-1000 mg/daily along with a blend of co-factors that aid the absorption of calcium such as boron, K2, and Vitamin D3,  eat lots of leafy green veggies and participate in weight bearing exercise regularly. In Chinese medicine it is the Kidney qi energy that nourishes the bones and marrow. So by eating well and exercising, you can supplement the Kidney energy. You can also supplement the Kidney qi with acupuncture and Chinese herbs.

Call Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs in NYC for an appointment: 646-504-2251 Not in NYC? Schedule a Skype Wellness Consultation: 646-504-2251

 

Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac., Herbalist, Author, Creator of HealthyStuffU.com
Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs
32 Union Square East, Suite 615N
New York, NY 10003
(646)-504-2251

How to Stop Smoking

For most people, smoking cessation is difficult. The first step is getting through the initial withdrawal symptoms. Acupuncture, herbs and the creation of a support system through friends and family are effective means to success.

Once you have succeeded, you must maintain your success. The long term quit rate is just above 50%. That is why this program requires 4-6 months follow-up treatment.

According to the director of The Institute for Traditional Medicine, the patient should consider the following:

  1. Patients who volunteer to stop smoking because they desire to quit are more likely to succeed than patients who are assigned, forced or persuaded to enter a program with little or no desire to quit.
  2. Short term smoking cessation, that is, stopping smoking at the end of a stop smoking program, is easier to attain than long-term smoking cessation. Regardless of the type of treatment, once the stop smoking treatment is successfully finished a variety of factors can affect the patient so as to induce re-initiation of smoking. Generally, if a person has stopped smoking for a full six months the chances of smoking again are very low.
  3. Short term smoking cessation success may depend on the extent to which the intervention provides regular reinforcement of the stop smoking effort. A person left to his or her own is more likely to resume smoking than a person who daily encounters someone who reinforces the stop smoking attempt.

Acupuncture stimulates production of endorphins and enkaphalins, which are hormones that reduce pain and cravings and have a soothing effect on the body.

In a Chinese study of 28 smokers treated with acupuncture, 26 reported that the taste of cigarettes changed, becoming undesirable or even objectionable. Some smokers even become nauseous if they attempt to smoke.

It is recommended that the patient take their herbs daily to calm the mind, increase the nutritional value to the foods they eat, drink plenty of water and take a multivitamin daily.

The following outline is for you to help in your stop smoking program.

  • Support Person: The decision to stop smoking can elicit uncomfortable emotions. Ask someone who is available to you in the next few weeks to act as a sounding board and provide encouragement when needed.
  • Affirmation: An affirmation is a positive statement repeated often to create desired changes in your life. Repeating the affirmation helps not only to remind you why you are no longer smoking but imprints a new image of health so that the body can produce health.
    Example: “I am a non-smoker. I make healthy choices in my life.”
  • Setting Boundaries: Set up contracts with other smokers to refrain from smoking in your presence. This includes spouses. When possible, stay away from smokers until you feel more confident with your non-smoking health status.
  • Drink Water: Research shows that dryness causes cravings. Sip water frequently throughout the day.
  • Refrain from Drinking Coffee and other caffeine drinks: Research shows these cause cravings and dehydrate the body.
  • Food Choices: Eat lots of sweet natured foods that are not sugary but naturally sweet such as carrots, honey, sweet potatoes, etc. Candies upset the blood sugar level, which can aggravate smoking-withdrawal. Sugar substitutes such as NutraSweet are sweeter than sugar and cause further aggravation to the body.
  • Managing Cravings: Cravings feel like they will last forever but actually fade in two minutes. Plan what you will do during a craving. Examples: Take your herbs, repeat your affirmation, breathe deeply, walk to another place, sing a song, dance, call your support person.
Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac., Herbalist, Author, Creator of HealthyStuffU.com
Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs
41 Union Square West, Suite 519
New York, NY 10003
(212) 894.0767