Tag: Chinese medicine

The Three Treasures; Jing, Qi, Shen

The calligraphy above depicts the Three Treasures: Jing, Qi, Shen. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, the preservation, protection and nourishment of the Three Treasures form the foundation of optimum health and spiritual well being.

The Basics:

Jing means Essence
Qi basically translates as Vital Energy
Shen means Spirit

The Details:

Jing – Essence
Jing is the source of life, health and longevity. We all are born with Jing Essence, which is stored in the Kidneys and which fuels all other energies. As we age, we naturally deplete our Jing essence; but chronic stress, illness and imbalance will exhaust our Jing faster than we can replenish it through foods and herbs. We must nourish Jing daily with acquired nutritive energy derived from healthy foods, water, meditation, exercise and Chinese herbs. To preserve and protect our Jing from depletion, we must avoid drug and alcohol abuse, bulimia or anorexia, excessive exercise and excessive sexual activities. The latter is especially important for men. Most healthy women don’t have to worry so much about losing essence through sexual activity. For all women it is more important to preserve blood. Chinese medicine tells us that Blood and Jing Essence share the same source. Blood preservation is especially important for a woman because when she loses blood, she loses Jing. The wisdom of a woman’s body initiates menopause as a way to preserve blood and essence for a longer healthier life. Women who experience very heavy menstrual periods or whose periods are absent may experience an Essence vacuity and require acupuncture and herbal treatment to regain healthy balance.

Qi – Vital Energy
In English, Qi roughly translates as vital energy, but its full meaning is as vast as the universe. The calligraphy of the Chinese word Qi depicts rice steaming, meaning that Qi is invisible like steam but also as substantial as rice. This energy is not an ethereal philosophical concept; Qi is palpable, movable, dynamic, storable, fluid and sustentative. It makes and defines everything about us, in us and around us. We are all made of Qi. Plants, herbs, insects and animals are made of Qi. The air we breathe is Qi. The energy we get from exercise is Qi. Acute or chronic illness, poor eating habits, sedentary lifestyles and excessive exercise or sleep will deplete Qi. Breathing exercises and healthy eating habits replenish Qi. Kung Fu practices such as Tai Chi, Qi Gong and other healing exercises that generate, move and store Qi. To nourish our Qi we must live a balanced lifestyle, eat well, breath, exercise and preserve our energy by avoiding types of situations and people that drain our energy.

Shen – Spirit
Chinese medicine views the Spirit as an integral part of our life and our physical wellbeing. Therefore Qi, Jing and Spirit cultivation is essential for health maintenance. The definition of spirituality is uniquely individual because different spiritual practices work for different people. Though the process of Spirit cultivation is dynamic and ever changing, most spiritual practices call for mindful living, intentionally based on right thinking and right action. In addition, certain herbs and tonics can help enhance and develop Shen energy. Buddhist teacher and writer Llama Surya Das imparts these words of wisdom, “Living spirituality and its religions are not monuments or mausoleums, but ARE more akin to rivers, which need and want to keep flowing and inexhaustibly replenishing themselves, outflowing anew while returning to the source, endlessly recycling and revitalizing themselves. Not static but ecstatic — a living river of Dharma, of truth and love, of genuine spirit.” When we nourish our Spirit, we cultivate truth, authenticity and compassion for ourselves and others in our daily lives, the result of which is energetic balance and mental clarity.

 

Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac., Herbalist, Author, Creator of HealthyStuffU.com
Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs
32 Union Square EAST, Suite 615N
New York, NY 10003
(646) 504.2251

 

Food Remedies for Colds and Flus

Remember how your parents always bugged you about wearing a hat and sweater in cooler weather? They knew that the possibility of a Wind-Cold invasion could lead to the flu, runny or stuffy noses, body aches and fevers.

We often combat Wind invasions by wearing our hat and sweaters but what happens if that doesn’t work? What if you catch a cold and it progressively worsens?

Chinese Dietary Therapy
Food can help prevent and treat most wind invasions. Wind is considered a pathogenic source which enters at the level of the head and face and if not expelled quickly may move deeper into the throat and chest. There are two types of wind pathogens, Wind-Cold and Wind-Heat. Most colds start off as a Wind-Cold invasion and may progress into wind-heat. We want to protect and nourish the Wei Qi or Defensive qi of the body through diet, herbs and exercise. Our bodies are made of Yin and Yang energies. When these energies are balanced we are healthy. Exterior pathogens can create an imbalance of our qi. The nature of food is also yin or yang. Therefore we can use food medicinally to balance our qi. First let’s examine the signs & symptoms of two common exterior conditions and then we will explore dietary prevention and treatment options.

Grate fresh ginger into soup or boil 3 slices with water & lemon

Compare the following two lists of symptoms. You should have most of the symptoms in one category before applying a dietary change. If you have conflicting symptoms, ask your acupuncturist for clarification. Don’t forget that acupuncture is effective to kick a cold or flu!

Wind-Cold Symptoms: Headache, runny nose with clear discharge, neck and shoulder aches, aversion to cold, a white tongue coating.

Special Dietary Consideration: If you are suffering from a Wind-Cold Invasion it is best to stick with foods whose qi qualities are warming, neutral and hot foods.

Wind-Heat Symptoms:
Sore throat, headache, cough, fever or elevated body temperature, body aches, little or no sweat, runny or stuffy nose with yellow discharge, a red tongue body w/ yellow coating. If the heat is very deep it may cause nausea or vomiting, depressed appetite, abdominal distention, chills and fever, heavy sweating, irritability, strong thirst.

Special Dietary Consideration: If you are suffering from a Wind-Heat Invasion it is best to stick with foods whose qi quality is neutral and cooling (try to avoid too many cold foods because they can damage your qi).

Basic Dietary Considerations for Wind-Cold and Wind-Heat Invasions:
While ill, it is best to eat light, easy to digest foods like soups, veggies, rice and rice noodles. Avoid eating lots of cold foods like salads, cold sandwiches, chilled drinks, ice pops, and soy ice cream. Also avoid foods that may cause Dampness in the body. Dampness is heavy in nature, obstructs Defensive qi and contributes to phlegm production. Therefore, stay away from foods that are damp in nature such as dairy products, fried foods, greasy foods, foods high in fat and alcohol. (Stir fry is usually OK as long you cook with a small amount of oil). Raw foods also contribute to cold and dampness. Salads, fruits and fruit juices should be taken in moderation or are to be completely avoided. Be aware that most chickens and meat contain antibiotics. It is best to eat organic chickens and meats because they are not fed antibiotics. The more antibiotics we consume the faster our body becomes immune to them. Antibiotics are also seen as a cause of dampness and cold in the body and when overused can cause qi imbalances which may manifest as fatigue, a susceptibility to more bacterial infections, yeast infections and more.


Prevention and Treatment of Wind-Cold Invasion:
Generally, I recommended foods to promote perspiration which forces out the wind toxin such as: ginger, scallion, chilies, coriander, cabbage. Avoid vinegar because it contracts the pores.

Teas – In prevention and treatment of a simple Wind-Cold headache try Green tea mixed with Peppermint tea. Fresh Ginger tea with a bit of brown sugar is good when you have the other symptoms as well.

Breakfast Food Example – Hot oats with local, raw honey (or pure maple syrup) and powdered cinnamon. Oats are warm and easy to digest, honey is sweet, nourishes body fluids and cinnamon is warm, pungent and unblocks channels for the upper body aches.

Soups – Miso Soup with Scallions – The fermented miso (soy paste) is sweet, salty and neutral. It strengthens the Stomach qi and detoxifies which will help dispel wind-cold and the scallions are warming and pungent which promotes sweating to relieve the exterior wind-cold invasion.Simply bring 2-3 cups of filtered or spring water to a boil. Add 2 tablespoons of miso paste, let dissolve. Cook for 10 minutes on low flame. Taste. If the flavor is too strong, add some water, vegetable or chicken broth. Chop the scallions and sprinkle about a teaspoon on top of your miso soup in the bowl. Avoid adding seaweed to this recipe, it is cold in nature.

Chicken Soup
Ingredients:

  • 3 Leeks thinly slice
  • 2-3 Tablespoons Olive oil
  • 6-8 cups filtered or spring water
  • 1 whole organic, antibiotic free chicken or chicken parts
  • 2 cups rice or rice noodles
  • Veggies for Wind-Cold or Heat as listed below
  • ½-1 teaspoon per serving of freshly grated ginger
  • 3-5 cloves of garlic, minced

Take 3 thin leeks, wash. Thinly slice the whites. Add 2-3 tablespoons of Olive oil to the bottom of a stock pot and turn flame on medium. When oil is warm, stir in leeks until they are lightly covered with oil. Lower flame and cover the pot to let leeks “sweat” for 10 minutes, occasionally stirring. Add in the garlic and saute for 2 minutes. Add 6-8 cups of water to the leeks. Add one washed organic chicken or 1 pound of organic chicken parts with bones. Place in stock pot. Cover with water. Boil for one hour. Cook 2 cups of unpolished white rice (20 minutes) or jasmine rice (10 minutes). Prepare freshly grated ginger, about 1 tablespoon. Turn down heat to let the water and fat settle. Scoop out or strain fat. Remove chicken from stock. You may prepare and add any of these warming veggies: squash, green bean, sweet potato, kale. Add veggies to a simmering stock for 10-15 minutes (or longer if using sweet potatoes). While the veggies are cooking, chop the chicken into spoon size pieces and add to the stock. After all the chicken is back in the stockpot, turn off the flame. Place rice and a ½ -1 teaspoon of grated ginger and desired amount of rice into a bowl and ladle soup over it. You can add a cinnamon stick or a touch of grated cinnamon to each bowl as well. To induce more sweating or clear the sinuses you can add some hot chili sauce to your soup. This soup does take time to make. You may want to make those soup and freeze a few containers of it so that when you are ill and fatigued you can simply warm it up and eat it.

Garlic, cinnamon, ginger and raw, local honey all have antibiotic and anti-viral effects.


Prevention and Treatment of Wind-Heat: Generally avoid pungent tasting foods and foods that have a very warm or hot nature such as scallions, chilies, wine and keep your intake light. Ginger can also be used in this case but avoid dried ginger because it is too hot and may aggravate this condition. It is great to help stop cough and nausea but do not overuse because it is warming. If you have a Wind-Heat Invasion you should also see your practitioner of Oriental Medicine for herbs and other treatments.

Teas – Peppermint and/or Chrysanthemum tea with local, raw honey. These herbs dispel heat and the honey nourishes Yin body fluids that may become damaged by heat. Peppermint is also used for sinus congestion.

Breakfast Food Example – Warm tea and Amaranth flakes cereal with unsweetened almond milk. You may add almonds, walnuts and or honey to help stop coughing.

Soup – We are going to use the same basic chicken soup recipe as above except you will not use cinnamon or chiles, or those vegetables. Instead you can use cooling veggies: bok choy, broccoli, cauliflower, celery, corn, mushroom, spinach, swiss chard, turnip, zucchini, bamboo shoots, button mushroom, carrot, dandelion greens, potato.

Acupuncture & Herbal Treatment of Uterine Fibroids

Herbs for buddhaChinese herbal medicine can help shrink uterine fibroids and acupuncture can help with any pain associated with them. Juliette Aiyana will customize your herbal treatment for you.

Q: Are there any alternative or natural treatment options to having a hysterectomy for fibroids?

A: Yes. Acupuncture and Chinese herbal therapy have been used for centuries to treat uterine fibroids effectively. In very severe cases, there may be no alternative treatment from heavy medications or surgery. However, in many cases fibroids will effectively shrink or disappear as a result of Chinese herbal medicine.

Aside from being gentle and promoting whole-person health, treatment addresses the root cause of fibroid growth instead of just the symptom itself. When the underlying cause of fibroids is treated, they are less likely to keep growing back, which tends to be a problem following hormone or surgical treatments. For many women, the fibroids disappear naturally after menopause.

Acupuncture and Chinese Herbs are a viable, natural and conservative therapy for small uterine fibroids under 8 cm.

Or if you have larger fibroids acupuncture and herbs might be able to manage the symptoms of pain and heavy bleeding.

Q: How do acupuncture and Chinese herbs help fibroids?

A: Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) treats fibroids as a symptom of energetic imbalance, just as it treats other medical complaints. Your acupuncturist will determine the underlying cause of the disease through careful evaluation of your present symptoms as well as a head-to-toe assessment of all the body’s functions. Juliette Aiyana will treat you using acupuncture, dietary, lifestyle and herbal suggestions tailored to your body’s individual needs.

Q: How many treatments does it take to treat fibroids?

A: I recommend acupuncture and Chinese herbal therapy consults for fibroids 1-2 times per month, for 3-12 months depending on the case. Each patient’s case is different, and the total number of treatments required depends on several factors including the size of the fibroids and how long they have been growing in the uterus, as well as the underlying energetic condition of the patient.

Video Chat Herbal Wellness Consultations are Available. Learn more HERE.

A friend of mind recommended Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac., Herbalist to me on a day that I was suffering with severe neck and back pain. After visiting her website, the neck and back pain became a non-issue because I saw literature on female problems that were very familiar to me: endometriosis, fibroids, etc. Needless to say, I scheduled an appointment right away and have not regretted it for a moment. I had an ovarian cyst and fibroid for approximately six months, which became progressively worse; it grew and caused sharp pain in my side. My gynecologist suggested another surgery, but I didn’t entertain the thought of being cut again for the same problem which grew back after the previous surgeries.

Juliette initially administered acupuncture once a week for about three months, and then reduced frequency to every other week; the week of my ovulation and a few days before my menses were due. She put me on a very strict diet that consisted of abstention from dairy products, cold foods and beverages, raw foods, and sugar; I’m already a vegetarian. As a matter of fact, I did the impossible; I totally eliminated chocolate from my diet.

Juliette’s treatment also included periodic massages, aromatherapy and the usage of a heat lamp, which were extremely relaxing. She taught me how to administer self-massage to break up the tightly adhered scars left by my previous surgeries. Last but not least, I was given a cocktail of Chinese herbs to take twice a day. The first symptom that relieved was the painful menstrual cramps I dealt with every month.

After a course of treatment for about six months, just imagine the excitement that came over me when my gynecologist told me that there was no more evidence of the cyst and fibroid that had been growing inside of me. He searched high and low for it and to our surprise it was gone. I shared this news with Juliette at my next visit and she, too, was excited. We both screamed and she danced around in a circle. That was awesome and some amazing healing”! -Tawana, Age 42. Read more of Juliette’s patient’s success stories! 

Q: Which underlying energetic imbalance causes uterine fibroids?

A: Most patients have several imbalances occurring simultaneously, but very commonly there is impeded blood flow to and from the uterus, known as blood stagnation, leading to accumulation of excess tissue. Other frequently related issues include imbalance of the liver and spleen energetic systems, the yin energy and/or phlegm accumulation.

Q: What are fibroids?

A: Uterine fibroids are benign tumors that are made up of the muscle and connective tissue from the wall of the uterus. Fibroids may grow as a single nodule or in clusters and may range in size from 1 mm to more than 20 cm (8 inches) in diameter. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), uterine fibroids affect at least 25% of women.

Q: What are the symptoms of fibroids?

A: Though many women with fibroids do not experience obvious symptoms, others suffer from excessive menstrual bleeding, painful periods, bleeding between periods, pelvic pain or fullness, pain during intercourse, and frequent urination.

Aside from the above symptoms of inconvenience and discomfort, fibroids can also interfere with fertility and are the leading cause of hysterectomy (removal of the uterus) in the United States. Milder cases are usually treated with hormone medications and less invasive surgery to control fibroid growth.

Many women prefer to avoid surgery. Dr. Herbert Goldfarb who published the The No-Hysterectomy Option, Your Body Your Choice, in 1990 because most physicians advocated the final solution to most women’s gynecological abnormalities to be hysterectomy. On his website he states, “The sad truth of the matter is that the uterus and pelvic organs are often considered by physicians to be expendable once a woman’s childbearing years are over. The pelvic organs are rarely studied outside the realm of reproduction. Most doctors believe that once a woman has had her children, the uterus and ovaries are then useless and can be removed”.

According to the FDA article entitled Alternatives to Hysterectomy;

      The United States has one of the highest rates of hysterectomy in the world, with about 5 out of every 1,000 women each year having the operation, according to the CDC. Other industrialized countries show lower rates; in England, for example, the rate is less than 3 per 1,000 women annually. In Norway, it’s less than 2 in 1,000. Some are concerned that many hysterectomies are done unnecessarily in this country. “There are some cases where hysterectomy is the only option, for instance, for some types of cancer,” says Anthony Scialli, M.D., director of the obstetrics and gynecology residency program at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington, D.C. “But I think we perform too many hysterectomies. It’s a matter of American gynecologists being accustomed to performing a hysterectomy and American women being accustomed to getting one–based on their mother or other female relative having one. The one thing in favor of a hysterectomy is that it works for abnormal uterine bleeding–but it should be the last step, not the first step.”


Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac. Herbalist

 32 Union Square East, Suite 615N New York, NY 10003

 

 

Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs as an Effective Treatment for Depression

Chinese herbal medicine can be very effective for mild to moderate depression

I recently asked a highly respected and experienced acupuncturist from China which diseases she treated the most using Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) when she was practicing in China. “Depression and pain,” she replied.

 

Acupuncture is becoming well known in the United States as an effective treatment of body pain, but exploring TCM deeper reveals wider applications, including for the treatment of depression.

 

 

 

“After feeling discouraged from the western medicine I was using to treat a chronic health problem, I sought out Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac. I thought that an alternative approach to my care may be more beneficial. Fortunately, I was right. I have been seeing Juliette for a little over a year now and she has been more effective than any other health practitioner I have come across. She is extremely attentive, careful, thorough and works very hard to ensure that her patients get the best treatments possible. Aside from the acupuncture and herbs, Juliette’s encouragement and insights have been key components to my personal healing process. Seeking out Juliette has been one of the best things I have ever done for myself”. -Anonymous.

Click Here For More Patient Reviews.

 

The many types of depression are defined as mood disorders by the American Psychiatric Association. The Mayo Clinic lists the following mental and physical signs and symptoms indicative of depression1:

  • Irritability
  • Feelings of anxiety
  • Loss of interest or pleasure in life
  • Neglect of personal responsibility or personal care
  • Changes in eating habits
  • Changes in sleeping patterns
  • Fatigue and loss of energy
  • Extreme mood changes
  • Feeling helpless, hopeless, or worthless
  • Physical symptoms (e.g., headaches, chronic pain)
  • Increased alcohol or drug use
  • Thoughts of death or suicide

Do you feel any of the symptoms listed above?
If so, Chinese medicine may be right for you.
Call 646-504-2251 to schedule an appointment in our office, or via Skype.

If you are having thoughts of death or suicide please call your medical doctor or a suicide hotline for immediate help; Click here if you in the U.S.A. Click here if you are International.

In the United States, the rate of people seeking medical treatment for depression markedly increased between the late 1980s and early 1990s and continued to increase through the 1990s.2 There are many side effects of antidepressant medication and many mimic the signs and symptoms of depression itself. Some of the various side effects of antidepressants are as follows3:

  • Dry mouth
  • Urinary retention
  • Blurred vision
  • Constipation
  • Sleep disruption
  • Weight gain
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Gastrointestinal disturbance/diarrhea
  • Abdominal pain
  • Inability to achieve an erection
  • Loss of libido
  • Agitation
  • Anxiety

Depression is a very complicated disease that affects mental health and the various physical systems of the body resulting in decreased quality of life. Health is the balance among all of the emotional and physical occurrences in the body. If these fall out of balance, disease will occur. For example, one may become depressed because of a battle with insomnia or one may become an insomniac resulting from a struggle with depression.

Acupuncture increases the “happy” hormones; serotonin, endorphins & enkephalins while reducing the stress hormone,cortisol

TCM approaches health and disease with the understanding that the mind and body function as one operable unit not to be treated as two separate, unrelated parts. The National Institute of Health states that in TCM, qi (pronounced “chee”) is believed to regulate a person’s spiritual, emotional, mental, and physical balance, and to be influenced by the opposing forces of yin and yang. This description highlights TCM’s view of the mind-body connection of health.4

According to TCM theory, depression is a disease that occurs from stagnant or depressed qi in the body creating emotional and physical imbalance. Acupuncture and herbs can regulate stagnant qi resolving the depressive state in the body and help achieve health. Clinical trials analyzing acupuncture as treatment for depression, patients who experienced acupuncture improved slightly more than patients treated with an antidepressant drug alone.5

 

 

Acupuncture and herbs are effective, safe treatments for depression and can be used alone or in conjunction with antidepressants. Call today, and Juliette Aiyana will work with you to help you attain overall health and a better quality of life!

Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac., Herbalist, Author, Creator of HealthyStuffU.com
Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs
32 Union Square East, Suite 615N
New York, NY 10003
(646)504-2251

– – –
1 http://www.mayoclinic.org/depression/diagnosis.html
2 Mojtabai, R. M.D., Ph.D., and Mark Olfson, M. M.D., M.P.H. (2006). Treatment Seeking for Depression in Canada and the United States. Psychiatric Services. 57:631-639.
3 http://www.clinical-depression.co.uk/Treating_Depression/side_effects.htm
4 http://nccam.nih.gov/health/acupuncture
5 Röschke J, Wolf C, Miller MJ, Wagner P, Mann K, Grözinger M, and Bech S. (2000). The benefit from whole body acupuncture in major depression. Journal of affective disorders. 57(1-3):73-81

Stop Your Sniffling: Treat Seasonal Allergies with Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs!

Seasonal Allergies Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs Treatment
Acupuncture, herbs, supplements and diet change treat and prevent allergies

Seasonal Allergies can be put to rest!

Finally, the sun is out and the warm weather upon us. But for roughly 45 million Americans, seasonal allergies (also known as hay fever or allergic rhinitis) make this time of year a miserable one. How can allergy sufferers enjoy themselves with all the sneezing, runny nose, fatigue, sinus pressure, congestion, red itchy eyes, scratchy throat and headache?

Many seasonal allergies sufferers turn to medications throughout the season despite the common side effects of drowsiness, dryness, dizziness, fatigue, insomnia, nervousness, and digestive disturbance. There’s also immune system suppression and the risk of becoming medication-dependent to worry about. Worse still, the Western treatment of allergies treats only the symptoms and not the root cause. Those seeking a natural and effective alternative need search no further than Chinese medicine.

In Chinese medicine the strategy behind treatment is alleviating the acute symptoms as well as correcting the root energetic imbalance causing those symptoms. The symptoms of seasonal allergies are most often related to underlying disharmonies involving wei qi, or defensive energy, phlegm or dampness, and the lung, spleen, and kidney energy systems, all of which I explain below.

Wei Qi and Lung Qi: In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), illness prevention begins with a protective layer around the exterior of the body called wei qi, or defensive energy. A strong and healthy wei qi is the body’s initial protection against all external pathogens. If the defensive energy is weak, “wind pathogens” transmitted through the air will enter the body, so a combination of a wind-born pathogen and a deficiency of the protective wei qi is a recipe for illness. People with wei qi deficiency catch colds easily, and seasonal allergies symptoms may be particularly bad in the spring or fall seasons which are generally windy. Patients with seasonal allergies, chronic cough and/or recurrent colds and flu are also likely to have Lung deficiency, since wei qi and immune function are part of the lung energy. Lung qi controls the domain of skin, lungs, nose, sinuses, and respiratory passages.

Spleen Qi: Behind every weak immune system is a deficiency of the spleen qi, part of the digestive system. It is the job of the spleen to make healthy qi from food. If the spleen qi is weak, it is not able to efficiently digest food and make a healthy quality of energy to distribute to all systems of the body. The immune system suffers. Spleen qi deficiency is usually accompanied by dampness; fluids fail to metabolize and often end up turning to excess phlegm and mucus. Spleen Qi vacuity with Dampness is a common underlying condition with allergy symptoms.

Kidney Qi: Since kidney energy is the root of constitutional and all other energy systems in the body, it is usually related to imbalances involving deficiency. Especially when seasonal allergies, asthma, or frequent or chronic respiratory illness are problems since childhood, the kidney energy must be addressed. It is also important to note that kidney energy is damaged by long-term medication use.

Allergies & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Chinese herbs are very important both for quick relief of the acute symptoms as well as support for the underlyingSeasonal Allergies Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs Treatment imbalance in energy responsible for allergic problems. Though every patient has a unique combination of symptoms and is treated according to their individual pattern, the most common treatment principles are boosting the lung qi, wei qi, and supporting the spleen qi while expelling wind and phlegm dampness from the body.

There are many Chinese herbs that build wei qi and enhance the immune system. For best results (and safety!), herbal formulas should be prescribed only by professionally trained herbalists. The formula prescribed will address each patient’s unique presentation of symptoms, and hence will vary greatly from case to case. However, an example of one of the simplest and most famous formulas is called Jade Windscreen and is comprised of just three immunity-enhancing herbs: Huang qi (Astragalus), Fang feng (Saposhnikovia) and Bai zhu (Atractylodes).

Huang qi (Astragalus) is traditionally used to strengthen wei qi. Modern research has identified several notable pharmacological effects confirming its historical use. Huang qi is an immunostimulant, increasing both specific and non-specific immunity. It also increases the number of white blood cells and has antibiotic actions against streptococcus and staphylococcus. Clinical studies have shown it effective in the prevention of colds and respiratory infections. It is also considered a hepatoprotective (liver-protecting) herb.

Fang feng’s (Saposhnikovia) TCM name is translated to mean “guard against wind,” and it has antibiotic and antiviral properties.

Bai zhu (Atractylodes) is traditionally used as a tonic to build both spleen qi and wei qi. Recent studies have shown that Bai zhu increases the activity of macrophages and increases the number of white blood cells and lymphocytes.

The above herbs are also included in many variations of the original Jade Windscreen formula, such as Allerease by Blue Poppy, which is often relevant and prescribed.

Allergies and Lifestyle: Survival Tips
The following suggestions may help minimize suffering:

  1. Minimize exposure to your allergens. Check your local TV, newspaper or the Internet for pollen forecasts and current pollen levels, and stay indoors when the pollen count or humidity is high. The morning is prime pollen time – especially if it is dry and windy. Plan outdoors activities for later in the day, or after a good rain, when pollen counts are lower.
  2. Keep windows shut when the pollen count is high, including those in your house and car. Use air conditioning if possible, or keep indoor air dry with a dehumidifier. A HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filter or an electrostatic precipitator may also help clean pollen and mold from the indoor air.

  3. Don’t hang laundry outside, since pollen may cling to towels and sheets. Wash all bedding every 7 to 14 days. Also, remove clothes you’ve worn outside and shower to rinse pollen from your skin and hair.
  4. Avoid mowing the grass, pulling weeds or raking leaves. If you must do these, wear a mask to filter pollen and molds from the air.
  5. Plan vacations where pollen isn’t prevalent. A good choice is the beach.
  6. Swim for exercise. In fact, you’ll find one of the purest concentrations of air in the ten to 15 inch layer right above the water, and the gentle humidity keeps your airways from drying out. If you exercise outdoors, use a neti pot before and after exercising to get rid of dust, pollen, and mucus from your nose.
Seasonal Allergies Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs Treatment
Chinese herbal medicine & other natural supplements are very effective for allergies

Diet and Supplements for Allergy Season
In general, eating a well-balanced healthy diet will keep the immune system strong. Specifically, minimize or avoid cows milk and other dairy products as they contribute to the production of phlegm and mucus. Overindulgence in simple carbohydrates and sweets can also contribute to allergies, since they harm the spleen qi.

Include both omega-3 and omega-6s fatty acids included in salmon, tuna, mackerel, and other cold-water fish. Eat mercury containing fish, such as tuna, in moderation especially pregnant women. Check the USDA Website for more information on mercury and fish. Flax seeds, hemp seeds, walnuts, and canola oil are high in alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), which the body converts to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), the form found in fish.

Another article about Natural Allergy Control gives more suggestions about diet and supplements that may be helpful. It also explains how allergies are related to imbalances in the nervous system, and which allergies respond well to chiropractic care.

Prevention is the Best Medicine

The best time to get treated for seasonal allergies is before they show up. Starting a treatment program including acupuncture and Chinese herbs 6-8 weeks before they typically start for you, helps boost the immune system and hence prevent symptoms from appearing since the underlying energy will be strong and resilient. However, if allergy symptoms are already bothering you, start treatment as soon as possible for best results.

Contact Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs for more information or to make an appointment today!

646-504-2251

Seasonal Allergies Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs Treatment

Endometriosis Treatment with Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs

Endometriosis Treatment with Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Therapy

It is safe and effective, learn more below…

Endometriosis is a condition suffered by women of reproductive age and affects an estimated 89 million women around the world, regardless of background or race–Learn more about Endometriosis Treatment with Acupuncture. The word endometriosis is derived from the word “endometrium,” which is the lining inside of a woman’s uterus. The uterine endometrium (sometimes called endometrial tissue or lining) is normally shed during each menstrual period. Every month when a woman has her menstrual period, if the ovulated egg is not fertilized, the endometrial tissue along with blood and the unfertilized egg are shed from the uterus resulting in menstruation. Endometriosis Treatment with Acupuncture and Chinese herbs are a safe and effective natural treatment for endometriosis.

With woman suffering from endometriosis, the endometrial tissue normally found in the uterus is also present on the outside of the uterus, in the pelvic cavity. The endometrial tissue outside the uterus responds to the hormonal changes that occur each menstrual month in women but unlike the uterine endometrial lining, this tissue is not expelled from the body during menstruation. Instead, the endometrial tissue lingers and is slowly absorbed into the body which then inflames the surrounding tissues.

Women with endometriosis usually experiences lower abdominal pain 5-7 days before menstruation, during menstruation or with ovulation. Many women who are suffering from endometriosis experience irregular menstruation with excessive bleeding and clotting during their menses, low back pain, nausea, vomiting,intestinal upsets, fatigue, pain with sexual intercourse, discomfort with urination or bowel movements, and infertility. It is estimated that 30 to 40 percent of women who report infertility problems have endometriosis.

After undergoing two pelvic surgeries that led to adhesions which caused more pain than the fibroid or endometriosis I had the surgeries for, I was despondent. Pain medication left me unable to function during the day and the alternatives the medical community offered me: a hysterectomy, nerve blocks or hormones, held no guarantees, had risks and were just unacceptable to me. My personality changed as I was in constant, unrelenting pain.

The only relief I had was the sleep I feel in to every night after taking prescription pain killers. I stopped making plans with friends, did not want to socialize and just counted the hours until I could medicate and go to sleep. One day, I was on an endometriosis website and one of the bloggers was singing the praises of acupuncture. I decided I had nothing to lose and found Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac., Herbalist in her NYC office. At my first appointment I told her that I was just looking for relief, not a cure, and while she made no promises Juliette made it clear that her goal was to cure me of all pain. I knew then how serious, professional, caring and dedicated she is.

With acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, supplements such as fish oils and B-complex, and heat lamp therapy, Juliette Aiyana, has literally given me my life back and she achieved her goal; I am pain free. I continue to see Juliette pro-actively, although I can honestly state that I was “cured” after about two months of treatment. I don’t like to think about what would have happened to me if I had not found Juliette”. – Caroline, Age 47.

Read more success stories from Juliette Aiyana’s patients.

 

Call 646-504-2251 for an appointment.

Western Diagnosis and Treatment

Although the causes of endometriosis remain unknown, several different theories have been put forward as to what the cause(s) may be. The most commonly accepted theory is retrograde menstruation, also known as “backward menstruation.” Normally during the menses the menstrual blood is shed and comes out. In some women, a small amount of blood flows backwards down the fallopian tubes and into the pelvic cavity. This blood contains cells from the uterine lining (endometrium). It is not known why in some women this might implant and lead to endometriosis, it may have something to do with a particular woman’s immune response and ability to fight off and remove these cells. Another theory suggests that endometrial tissue is distributed from the uterus to other parts of the body through the lymphatic system or through the blood system. A genetic theory suggests that it may be carried in the genes in certain families or that some families may have predisposing factors. If your mother or sister has endometriosis, you are six times more likely to get the disease than other women.

The Western diagnosis and treatment for this condition are invasive and include surgery and drug therapy. A laparoscopy or laparotomy is usually performed to diagnose the condition. For laparoscopy surgery, a lighted optical tube is inserted through a small incision in the navel, and is often referred to as “bellybutton surgery.” Laparotomy is a more extensive procedure where there is a full incision and a longer recovery period. Radical surgery, which may be necessary in severe cases, involves hysterectomy, removal of all growths, and removal of ovaries.

 

Eastern Endometriosis Treatment with Acupuncture and Diagnosis
In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), groups of symptoms, or syndromes, are typically classified into patterns that involve the internal organs and/or energy pathways of the body. In TCM, the primary pattern or mechanism which causes endometriosis is Blood stagnation.

If there is a free flow of qi and blood, there will be no pain, but if there is no free flow of qi and blood, there will be pain.

This means that if the blood and qi are stagnant and not flowing freely (specifically in lower abdominal region), there will be pain.

Spleen qi deficiency and blood stasis: The cause of this pattern is chronic illness or constitutional weakness. Some of the signs and symptoms of this pattern include lower abdominal pain, fatigue, abdominal tenderness that may feel better with pressure, pain during or after periods, preference for warmth, prolapsed bearing down feeling in the uterus, a feeling of anxiousness and worry, loose or soft bowel movements, bruising easily, pale complexion, menstrual periods that are either heavy or scanty and contain blood clots, thick-pale tongue body with tooth-marks on the sides and visible red dots, and a thin-wiry or weak pulse.Blood stagnation can be caused by emotional disturbance, chronic illness, exposure to cold temperatures, surgery, and genital infections. Although blood stasis is the primary pattern in endometriosis, it is often combined with other patterns such as spleen qi deficiency, kidney deficiency, liver qi stagnation, cold stagnation or heat obstruction. The TCM diagnosis is differentiated based on the clinical manifestations associated with each case of endometriosis. The timing, location, nature, and severity of pain are taken into account, along with associated symptoms. The following syndromes are the most commonly seen patterns in women who are suffering from endometriosis:

Liver qi stagnation and blood stasis: The cause of this pattern lies in emotional stress and anxiety. Some of the signs and symptoms include severe lower abdominal pain, abdominal tenderness with an aversion to pressure, breast distention and tenderness before periods, feeling of frustration, distending pain under the rib cage, aversion to pressure on the abdomen, bitter taste in the mouth, menstrual periods that contain a lot of blood clots, menstrual pain relieved after the periods, a dark purple tongue with red spots, and a wiry-choppy pulse.Kidney deficiency and blood stasis: The cause of this pattern is either a constitutional weakness, or a history of surgical procedures. Some of the signs and symptoms of this pattern include lower abdominal pain, lower back weakness and aches, sore knees, fearfulness, ringing in the ears, a feeling of pressure and pain during or after menstrual periods, dizziness, irregular periods, scanty periods or spotting that include blood clots, a history of infertility or habitual miscarriage, a pale tongue color that has red spots, and a deep-thin-choppy pulse.

Cold stagnation and blood stasis: The cause of this pattern is a history of exposure to cold – either cold temperatures (externally), or the chronic consumption of cold foods (internally), especially during menstruation. Some of the signs and symptoms of this pattern include lower abdominal pain and tenderness, pressure and pain before or during periods with a preference for warmth, an aversion to cold, watery menstrual period with blood clots, menstrual pain relieved after the periods, nausea, loose stools, pale complexion, a pale, bluish/purplish tongue with red spots, and a wiry-tight pulse

Heat obstruction and blood stasis: The cause of this pattern is a history of genital infections (in TCM this is considered to be an accumulation of heat toxins in the body). Some of the signs and symptoms of this pattern are, lower abdominal pain and tenderness that are worse with pressure, a fever before, during, or after periods, preference for cold temperatures and foods, bitter taste in the mouth, dry throat, feeling of frustration, constipation, pain during intercourse, a red tongue with red or purple spots, and wiry-rapid pulse.

We advise you to come into the clinic 1 – 2 times per week for acupuncture and will usually combine a Chinese herbal formula for you to take as well. Effectively treating the root cause of endometriosis takes approximately three menstrual cycles. Some women will see a reduction in their symptoms right away while others may take a longer period of time. Stress levels, lifestyle, and general health are important factors involved in response time.It is important to note that most women suffering from endometriosis have more than one pattern diagnosis, therefore you may have symptoms from one or all patterns described above.

 

 

 

Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac. Herbalist

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I Know Why Dave Chappelle Quit His Job

Dave quit his job to escape the stress. No amount of money is worth selling your soul for work nor is it worth not being allowed to manifest your soul’s work.

No. It was not because he was smoking crack as the media rumor mill tried to convince us. Did they think the only reason someone would walk away from a multi-million dollar job is because they were on crack? Or did they think that the only reason a black man would do that was because he was on crack? The media does a great job of manufacturing public thought especially when it is racist or sexist thought. And that is one of the reasons Dave quit- as you will read below.

Dave Chappelle joined the few who realize that putting up with certain pressures from work are not worth it. Stress is not worth the money, physical illness or emotional distress it can induce. It is not worth doing things which you consider unethical or uncreative.

Stressed? Try Acupucture, It Works!  Call 646-504-2251 for an appointment.

I watched Dave on Oprah and Inside the Actor’s Studio. He talked about the pressure his company placed on him to do certain things with the show that he completely disagreed with. He specifically mentioned a skit shown on the “Lost Episodes” which he believed only confirmed racial stereotypes rather than, in his usual style, mirroring them to us so we can stop using them. I saw the skit and I completely agree with him in spite of the audiences vote. Dave took the bold stance against popularity and financial gain. Dave stands for creative awareness and freedom, cultural awareness and freedom, and self-awareness and freedom.

Many of my patients are ill because of work related stress. They suffer fatigue, anxiety, headaches, frequent colds, insomnia, skin conditions , infertility, weight gain or loss and digestive problems such as IBS, and the list goes on. We

Stress from work or at home can compromise mental and physical health

all live in a society in which we must work to survive. So the very thought of quitting our jobs to find something more spiritually fulfilling can be scary. We worry about our bills, family responsibilities and financial freedom. But the truth is that we cannot have any of those things without our health in body and mind .

As I work with patients who are suffering from physical and emotional pain and illness we discuss lifestyle choices. Many of them decide to make the bold decision to change their lifestyle so that they can free themselves of this suffering. They make personal revelations about how daily choices effect their relationships with friends, family, co-workers, partners- or how choices block them from developing deep relationships because they are working 60 (or more) hours per week .

Lifestyle change is a branch treatment within Chinese medicine. For some people, lifestyle change does not need to be as  drastic as leaving a job. Maybe you can cut work to part-time or take breaks during the work day, stop eating lunch at the desk and go outside to eat, exercise, or use earned vacation time no matter how many pressing client jobs are on the plate. Your employers give you vacation time for a reason. If they get upset because you use the time you are entitled to, that is their problem, don’t make it yours. The government made labor laws for a reason. These laws protect our rights to breaks during the work day .

Are there ways you can reduce your stress, cultivate a sense that you are working toward the greater good for your self, your family or society? Take some time to think about this for yourself. Maybe even journal your thoughts and reflect on them. How much do you lose because of your job? And how much of that is worth the money? Do you know now why Dave Chappelle quit his job?

Stressed? Try Acupuncture, It Works!

Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac., Herbalist, Author, Creator of HealthyStuffU.com
Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs
32 Union Square East, Suite 615N
New York, NY 10003
(646) 504.2251

Natural Support for Hashimoto’s Thyroid Disease with Acupuncture, Chinese Herbs, Food, Vitamins and Self-Care

How Acupuncture, Chinese Medicine, Diet, Exercise and Supplements
Can Help Manage This Auto-Immune Disorder

Stay warm!

Hashimoto’s disease effects women eight times more often than men. Clinically, the thyroid is enlarged, accompanied by hypothyroidism. The typical medical treatment is lifelong administration of a thyroid hormone.

Patients diagnosed with Hashimoto’s complain that they are extremely fatigued, suffer from a cold body, many have chronic joint pain or inflammation; sometimes they even have numbness and tingling in the hands and feet. Some present with allergies to food such as wheat or airborne allergens. In my practice, it seems the severity of complicating symptoms exacerbate with age.

How Can Chinese Medicine Help You?

Chinese Medicine treats the root cause of disharmony in your body. During the first visit with your practitioner, she will take an extensive health history and use techniques called Tongue Diagnosis and Pulse Diagnosis. She will connect all of the information she has gathered into a “pattern differentiation”.

Basically, what that means is she finds your unique pattern of energetic disharmony and treats that instead of administering one cookbook treatment for every patient with the same disease.

It is said in Chinese Medicine, “Same Disease, Different Treatment. Different Disease, Same Treatment”. In other words, your treatment is based upon specific Chinese medical methodology to create an individualized treatment plan for each patient. Chinese Medicine works so effectively because your practitioner acknowledges that you are not merely your disease.

So unlike western medicine which gives all Hashimoto’s patients the same treatment, practitioners of Chinese medicine will design a unique Chinese herbal medicine and acupuncture treatment protocol especially for you.

How Many Treatments Will You Need?

Treatments for auto-immune disorders are ongoing. At first you may go to your practitioner every week for about 3 months. Then you and your practitioner will decide the best treatment plan for you.

Auto-immune disorders are chronic; therefore, acupuncture and Chinese herbal therapies can be used to support your health and energy throughout your life especially in times of stress.

I teach my patients the self care techniques listed below so that we can create a healing partnership and so they can take care of themselves on a daily basis.

 

Call Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs in NYC for an appointment: 646-504-2251

Not in NYC? Schedule a Skype Wellness Consultation: 646-504-2251

 

Self-Care Techniques and Home Remedies For Patients with Hashimoto’s Thyroid Disease:

  1. Diet Adjustments
    Eat cooked leafy greens, black beans, yellow squash, meat and meat broths for blood vacuity. Patients with blood vacuity are often cold, experience fatigue, have dry skin, hair and nails and possible scant menstruation, skipped, late or missed periods.

    Essential fatty acids reduce inflammation

    Therefore blood supplementation is important for Hashimoto’s patients. Eat almonds, walnuts, sunflower seeds and avocado for essential fatty acids which reduce joint inflammation and are shown to level out blood glucose levels. Avoid white refined flour and sugars. Eat whole grains and rice instead.  Special attention should be paid to your Spleen Qi. The Spleen produces qi, blood and body fluids essential to health.

  2. Supplements
    Take a complete whole foods based multi-vitamin daily and a Calcium- Magnesium blend the ratio of which should be two times the amount of Calcium to Magnesium. Choose the bio-avilable form of calcium; citrate or citrate/malate.  Essential Fatty Acids (EFA’s) found in fish oils especially Omega 3’s reduce joint inflammation. EFA’s can be found in flax seed oil, hemp seed oil and evening primrose oil, fatty fish oils, nuts, seeds and avocado. Vitamin D3 aids thyroid function. Selenium level are usually extremely low for patient with thyroid dysfunction yet it is important for thyroid health.   Join our e-mail list to gain access to 15% all supplements via our online ordering system, wellevate, every time you order.
  3. Exercise Regularly
    If you feel more energized after exercise keep it up, but if you feel drained try a different form of exercise which consume less energy like simply walking everyday. Exercise will help you feel warmer and reduces stress. Yoga, tai-chi and qi-gong build energy and help many people feel relaxed and centered. In the case of my 25 year old patient, she can work out several times a week, and feel energetic after. But when she stops her routine, fatigue worsens, and it is hard for her to get back into the routine because of the increased fatigue. So maintain a regular program even if that simply means you walk 20 minutes a day.
  4. Dress Warmly
  5. Reduce Stress
    Keep your immune system strong by managing stress. Stress creates over-thinking and worry depleting the Spleen qi. The Spleen transforms and transports food energy into qi, blood and body fluids necessary for balance. Anger, resentment, unfulfilled desires and emotional depression can further stagnate Liver Qi energy. The Liver is responsible for the smooth flow of energy for the whole body so it is important to keep it healthy. Expressing feelings in discussions and in writing can be very helpful. Avoid people who usurp your energy. Strengthen your support system of friends and family. Avoid overworking.
    Get enough sleep. Some people find that mediation or prayer is helpful or qi cultivation/relaxation exercises such as yoga, tai chi or qi gong. Seek professional care from a therapist or support group if needed. Make choices that nourish your spirit.
  6. Acupuncture and Chinese Herbal Medicine. TCM offers herbs which help to warm the body, reduce or eliminate pain, and increase energy.  Acupuncture treats pain, relaxes the mind and body and reduces stress.

Special Note: Women who take thyroid medication have a higher incidence of Osteoporosis. That is why it is very important for them to take a calcium supplement 500-1000 mg/daily along with a blend of co-factors that aid the absorption of calcium such as boron, K2, and Vitamin D3,  eat lots of leafy green veggies and participate in weight bearing exercise regularly. In Chinese medicine it is the Kidney qi energy that nourishes the bones and marrow. So by eating well and exercising, you can supplement the Kidney energy. You can also supplement the Kidney qi with acupuncture and Chinese herbs.

Call Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs in NYC for an appointment: 646-504-2251 Not in NYC? Schedule a Skype Wellness Consultation: 646-504-2251

 

Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac., Herbalist, Author, Creator of HealthyStuffU.com
Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs
32 Union Square East, Suite 615N
New York, NY 10003
(646)-504-2251

Don’t Skip Sleep! Acupuncture works for insomnia.

Acupuncture for insomnia is very effective. Numerous studies support what Chinese medical practitioners have known for thousands of years.

Read more about scientific studies on acupuncture for insonia herehttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19922248

Acupuncture can usually relieve insomnia within just 4-6 visits!

Many people do not get adequate sleep, and whether it’s due to insomnia or other factors, attention must be paid to getting enough rest.

Sleep is completely essential to overall health and quality of life, and those deprived of adequate amounts are very likely to experience a range of symptoms, including weight gain, depression or anxiety, diabetes, and high blood pressure. Ready for a great night’s rest?

 

The following articles support different highlights on the importance of adequate sleep. Recent studies suggest that doctors should include inquiries about patients’ quality and quantity of sleep in a general check-up as a new vital sign.

Chinese Medicine agrees that sleep is vitally important, and has recognized through the ages that the body’s systems are interconnected. Difficulty sleeping or lack of substantial sleep is almost always linked to other symptoms that indicate the body is out of balance. Faster intervention is always best, since symptoms of illness can become more numerous and severe if the problem is ignored.

Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac., Herbalist was so warm and friendly from our initial meeting. She took the time to explain what acupuncture was, asked very detailed questions in order to treat me appropriately. She creates a soothing and comfortable environment when working with you. She receives nothing but high recommendations from me!” – Simone

One study concluded the following: “Insomnia and trouble sleeping are most often associated with high blood pressure, heart failure, anxiety and depression,according to a national survey of 31,044 adults. It had been thought that insomnia was quite prevalent on its own, but only 4 percent of the people [with] insomnia had it without any of those conditions”.

Lack of sleep, in multiple studies, has been linked to weight gain. There are several explanations for weight gain within Chinese Medicine for this phenomenon such as qi deficiency or qi stagnation.

Acupuncture for weight loss and acupuncture for insomnia can very successful. Western research suggests that sleep deprivation alters hormones involved with appetite and metabolism. More research shows that acupuncture can balance those very hormones.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) reported  that 1.6 million Americans get treated for insomnia using Complementary and Alternative Medicine, and the majority find the treatments effective.

Many people who experience symptoms of insomnia are eager a find natural solution because prescription drugs may offer temporary solutions, but can be addictive and often cause unwanted side effects. The bigger problem with treatment via chemical pharmaceuticals is that they do not treat the underlying cause of the insomnia and associated symptoms.

 

Treatment with Acupuncture and Chinese herbs is natural, safe and effective because it addresses both the underlying imbalance causing insomnia as well as other symptoms of disharmony in the body.

 

Rest Easy! Try Acupuncture, It Works!

Call Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs in NYC for an appointment with Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac.: 646-504-2251

Not in NYC? Schedule a Skype Wellness Consultation: 646-504-2251


Acupuncture alleviates headaches, migraines, cluster headaches, and menstrual headaches

Acupuncture is an excellent natural treatment for headaches, migraines, cluster headaches and menstrual headaches.

The British Medical Journal , and the National Institutes of Health  have published positive reports about the effectiveness of acupuncture for people suffering both chronic headaches or tension headaches.

Acupuncture is a safe and effective for treatment and prevention of headaches

“People using acupuncture had fewer headaches, less severe headaches and they used less health resources over the course of the following year,” Dr. Andrew Vickers of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York. In a randomized study of 401 patients who got headaches several days per week, patients who received 12 acupuncture treatments in three months reduced the frequency and severity of headaches, took 15% less medication, made 25% less visits to their doctor and took less sick days when compared to the other group who didn’t receive acupuncture. The reduction of medication and medical office visits made acupuncture a much more cost effective alternative.

 

 

At Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs, we are very successful at treating people for headaches, because we use the techniques of Chinese medicine; acupuncture, Chinese herbs, diet change, stress reduction, massage, cupping, gua sha, etc., which treat the symptoms and root cause of the headaches with no negative side-effects. Try our natural approach  instead of prescription or over-the-counter medications that only treat symptoms of headaches, which lead to rebound headaches and cause other undesirable side-effects. Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac. successfully treats acute sharp painful headaches, chronic dull achy headaches, migraines, cluster headaches, and menstrual headaches. Most patients feel immediate relief after treatment.

 

 

Cupping treatments feel great and effectively treat pain, and cold & flu.

How does it work?

There is a saying in Chinese medicine, “Where there is pain, there is no free flow and where there is free flow there is no pain.” The free flow is of Blood and Qi (pronounced “chee”). Health is when Qi and Blood flow smoothly throughout the body to nourish, heal and balance. Your practitioner will spend a considerable amount of time with you during your first visit to discover where your Qi and Blood are stagnated or out of balance and why. The where and why are called a pattern of energetic disharmony. The acupuncture points and herbs chosen are appropriate to balancing your unique pattern of disharmony. Every person is different so you will be treated based upon your individual pattern.

♦ In cases of sharp headache pain, the pattern may be excess Qi and Blood in the head so your practitioner will insert needles to move out the excess, thus relieving pain.

♦ Another pattern common to headache patients is that there is not enough Qi or Blood to circulating into the head. Therefore the treatment strategy would be to build, nourish and circulate Qi and Blood.

These are just a couple of examples of common clinical patterns which may cause headache pain.

How many visits will I need?
Patients who walk in with an acute headache usually leave without one. Generally a course of treatment for chronic headaches is one visit per week for three months. Treatment plans vary according to the pattern of energetic disharmony. Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac. will give you a tailored treatment plan during your first visit.

Live Headache Free Now, Call To Schedule an Appointment Today

Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac., Herbalist, Author, Creator of HealthyStuffU.com
Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs
32 Union Square East, Suite 615 N
New York, NY 10003
(646) 504.2251

 

Call 646-504-2251 To Schedule