Tag: Chinese Herbal Medicine

Food Remedies for Colds and Flus

Remember how your parents always bugged you about wearing a hat and sweater in cooler weather? They knew that the possibility of a Wind-Cold invasion could lead to the flu, runny or stuffy noses, body aches and fevers.

We often combat Wind invasions by wearing our hat and sweaters but what happens if that doesn’t work? What if you catch a cold and it progressively worsens?

Chinese Dietary Therapy
Food can help prevent and treat most wind invasions. Wind is considered a pathogenic source which enters at the level of the head and face and if not expelled quickly may move deeper into the throat and chest. There are two types of wind pathogens, Wind-Cold and Wind-Heat. Most colds start off as a Wind-Cold invasion and may progress into wind-heat. We want to protect and nourish the Wei Qi or Defensive qi of the body through diet, herbs and exercise. Our bodies are made of Yin and Yang energies. When these energies are balanced we are healthy. Exterior pathogens can create an imbalance of our qi. The nature of food is also yin or yang. Therefore we can use food medicinally to balance our qi. First let’s examine the signs & symptoms of two common exterior conditions and then we will explore dietary prevention and treatment options.

Grate fresh ginger into soup or boil 3 slices with water & lemon

Compare the following two lists of symptoms. You should have most of the symptoms in one category before applying a dietary change. If you have conflicting symptoms, ask your acupuncturist for clarification. Don’t forget that acupuncture is effective to kick a cold or flu!

Wind-Cold Symptoms: Headache, runny nose with clear discharge, neck and shoulder aches, aversion to cold, a white tongue coating.

Special Dietary Consideration: If you are suffering from a Wind-Cold Invasion it is best to stick with foods whose qi qualities are warming, neutral and hot foods.

Wind-Heat Symptoms:
Sore throat, headache, cough, fever or elevated body temperature, body aches, little or no sweat, runny or stuffy nose with yellow discharge, a red tongue body w/ yellow coating. If the heat is very deep it may cause nausea or vomiting, depressed appetite, abdominal distention, chills and fever, heavy sweating, irritability, strong thirst.

Special Dietary Consideration: If you are suffering from a Wind-Heat Invasion it is best to stick with foods whose qi quality is neutral and cooling (try to avoid too many cold foods because they can damage your qi).

Basic Dietary Considerations for Wind-Cold and Wind-Heat Invasions:
While ill, it is best to eat light, easy to digest foods like soups, veggies, rice and rice noodles. Avoid eating lots of cold foods like salads, cold sandwiches, chilled drinks, ice pops, and soy ice cream. Also avoid foods that may cause Dampness in the body. Dampness is heavy in nature, obstructs Defensive qi and contributes to phlegm production. Therefore, stay away from foods that are damp in nature such as dairy products, fried foods, greasy foods, foods high in fat and alcohol. (Stir fry is usually OK as long you cook with a small amount of oil). Raw foods also contribute to cold and dampness. Salads, fruits and fruit juices should be taken in moderation or are to be completely avoided. Be aware that most chickens and meat contain antibiotics. It is best to eat organic chickens and meats because they are not fed antibiotics. The more antibiotics we consume the faster our body becomes immune to them. Antibiotics are also seen as a cause of dampness and cold in the body and when overused can cause qi imbalances which may manifest as fatigue, a susceptibility to more bacterial infections, yeast infections and more.


Prevention and Treatment of Wind-Cold Invasion:
Generally, I recommended foods to promote perspiration which forces out the wind toxin such as: ginger, scallion, chilies, coriander, cabbage. Avoid vinegar because it contracts the pores.

Teas – In prevention and treatment of a simple Wind-Cold headache try Green tea mixed with Peppermint tea. Fresh Ginger tea with a bit of brown sugar is good when you have the other symptoms as well.

Breakfast Food Example – Hot oats with local, raw honey (or pure maple syrup) and powdered cinnamon. Oats are warm and easy to digest, honey is sweet, nourishes body fluids and cinnamon is warm, pungent and unblocks channels for the upper body aches.

Soups – Miso Soup with Scallions – The fermented miso (soy paste) is sweet, salty and neutral. It strengthens the Stomach qi and detoxifies which will help dispel wind-cold and the scallions are warming and pungent which promotes sweating to relieve the exterior wind-cold invasion.Simply bring 2-3 cups of filtered or spring water to a boil. Add 2 tablespoons of miso paste, let dissolve. Cook for 10 minutes on low flame. Taste. If the flavor is too strong, add some water, vegetable or chicken broth. Chop the scallions and sprinkle about a teaspoon on top of your miso soup in the bowl. Avoid adding seaweed to this recipe, it is cold in nature.

Chicken Soup
Ingredients:

  • 3 Leeks thinly slice
  • 2-3 Tablespoons Olive oil
  • 6-8 cups filtered or spring water
  • 1 whole organic, antibiotic free chicken or chicken parts
  • 2 cups rice or rice noodles
  • Veggies for Wind-Cold or Heat as listed below
  • ½-1 teaspoon per serving of freshly grated ginger
  • 3-5 cloves of garlic, minced

Take 3 thin leeks, wash. Thinly slice the whites. Add 2-3 tablespoons of Olive oil to the bottom of a stock pot and turn flame on medium. When oil is warm, stir in leeks until they are lightly covered with oil. Lower flame and cover the pot to let leeks “sweat” for 10 minutes, occasionally stirring. Add in the garlic and saute for 2 minutes. Add 6-8 cups of water to the leeks. Add one washed organic chicken or 1 pound of organic chicken parts with bones. Place in stock pot. Cover with water. Boil for one hour. Cook 2 cups of unpolished white rice (20 minutes) or jasmine rice (10 minutes). Prepare freshly grated ginger, about 1 tablespoon. Turn down heat to let the water and fat settle. Scoop out or strain fat. Remove chicken from stock. You may prepare and add any of these warming veggies: squash, green bean, sweet potato, kale. Add veggies to a simmering stock for 10-15 minutes (or longer if using sweet potatoes). While the veggies are cooking, chop the chicken into spoon size pieces and add to the stock. After all the chicken is back in the stockpot, turn off the flame. Place rice and a ½ -1 teaspoon of grated ginger and desired amount of rice into a bowl and ladle soup over it. You can add a cinnamon stick or a touch of grated cinnamon to each bowl as well. To induce more sweating or clear the sinuses you can add some hot chili sauce to your soup. This soup does take time to make. You may want to make those soup and freeze a few containers of it so that when you are ill and fatigued you can simply warm it up and eat it.

Garlic, cinnamon, ginger and raw, local honey all have antibiotic and anti-viral effects.


Prevention and Treatment of Wind-Heat: Generally avoid pungent tasting foods and foods that have a very warm or hot nature such as scallions, chilies, wine and keep your intake light. Ginger can also be used in this case but avoid dried ginger because it is too hot and may aggravate this condition. It is great to help stop cough and nausea but do not overuse because it is warming. If you have a Wind-Heat Invasion you should also see your practitioner of Oriental Medicine for herbs and other treatments.

Teas – Peppermint and/or Chrysanthemum tea with local, raw honey. These herbs dispel heat and the honey nourishes Yin body fluids that may become damaged by heat. Peppermint is also used for sinus congestion.

Breakfast Food Example – Warm tea and Amaranth flakes cereal with unsweetened almond milk. You may add almonds, walnuts and or honey to help stop coughing.

Soup – We are going to use the same basic chicken soup recipe as above except you will not use cinnamon or chiles, or those vegetables. Instead you can use cooling veggies: bok choy, broccoli, cauliflower, celery, corn, mushroom, spinach, swiss chard, turnip, zucchini, bamboo shoots, button mushroom, carrot, dandelion greens, potato.

Acupuncture & Herbal Treatment of Uterine Fibroids

Herbs for buddhaChinese herbal medicine can help shrink uterine fibroids and acupuncture can help with any pain associated with them. Juliette Aiyana will customize your herbal treatment for you.

Q: Are there any alternative or natural treatment options to having a hysterectomy for fibroids?

A: Yes. Acupuncture and Chinese herbal therapy have been used for centuries to treat uterine fibroids effectively. In very severe cases, there may be no alternative treatment from heavy medications or surgery. However, in many cases fibroids will effectively shrink or disappear as a result of Chinese herbal medicine.

Aside from being gentle and promoting whole-person health, treatment addresses the root cause of fibroid growth instead of just the symptom itself. When the underlying cause of fibroids is treated, they are less likely to keep growing back, which tends to be a problem following hormone or surgical treatments. For many women, the fibroids disappear naturally after menopause.

Acupuncture and Chinese Herbs are a viable, natural and conservative therapy for small uterine fibroids under 8 cm.

Or if you have larger fibroids acupuncture and herbs might be able to manage the symptoms of pain and heavy bleeding.

Q: How do acupuncture and Chinese herbs help fibroids?

A: Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) treats fibroids as a symptom of energetic imbalance, just as it treats other medical complaints. Your acupuncturist will determine the underlying cause of the disease through careful evaluation of your present symptoms as well as a head-to-toe assessment of all the body’s functions. Juliette Aiyana will treat you using acupuncture, dietary, lifestyle and herbal suggestions tailored to your body’s individual needs.

Q: How many treatments does it take to treat fibroids?

A: I recommend acupuncture and Chinese herbal therapy consults for fibroids 1-2 times per month, for 3-12 months depending on the case. Each patient’s case is different, and the total number of treatments required depends on several factors including the size of the fibroids and how long they have been growing in the uterus, as well as the underlying energetic condition of the patient.

Video Chat Herbal Wellness Consultations are Available. Learn more HERE.

A friend of mind recommended Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac., Herbalist to me on a day that I was suffering with severe neck and back pain. After visiting her website, the neck and back pain became a non-issue because I saw literature on female problems that were very familiar to me: endometriosis, fibroids, etc. Needless to say, I scheduled an appointment right away and have not regretted it for a moment. I had an ovarian cyst and fibroid for approximately six months, which became progressively worse; it grew and caused sharp pain in my side. My gynecologist suggested another surgery, but I didn’t entertain the thought of being cut again for the same problem which grew back after the previous surgeries.

Juliette initially administered acupuncture once a week for about three months, and then reduced frequency to every other week; the week of my ovulation and a few days before my menses were due. She put me on a very strict diet that consisted of abstention from dairy products, cold foods and beverages, raw foods, and sugar; I’m already a vegetarian. As a matter of fact, I did the impossible; I totally eliminated chocolate from my diet.

Juliette’s treatment also included periodic massages, aromatherapy and the usage of a heat lamp, which were extremely relaxing. She taught me how to administer self-massage to break up the tightly adhered scars left by my previous surgeries. Last but not least, I was given a cocktail of Chinese herbs to take twice a day. The first symptom that relieved was the painful menstrual cramps I dealt with every month.

After a course of treatment for about six months, just imagine the excitement that came over me when my gynecologist told me that there was no more evidence of the cyst and fibroid that had been growing inside of me. He searched high and low for it and to our surprise it was gone. I shared this news with Juliette at my next visit and she, too, was excited. We both screamed and she danced around in a circle. That was awesome and some amazing healing”! -Tawana, Age 42. Read more of Juliette’s patient’s success stories! 

Q: Which underlying energetic imbalance causes uterine fibroids?

A: Most patients have several imbalances occurring simultaneously, but very commonly there is impeded blood flow to and from the uterus, known as blood stagnation, leading to accumulation of excess tissue. Other frequently related issues include imbalance of the liver and spleen energetic systems, the yin energy and/or phlegm accumulation.

Q: What are fibroids?

A: Uterine fibroids are benign tumors that are made up of the muscle and connective tissue from the wall of the uterus. Fibroids may grow as a single nodule or in clusters and may range in size from 1 mm to more than 20 cm (8 inches) in diameter. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), uterine fibroids affect at least 25% of women.

Q: What are the symptoms of fibroids?

A: Though many women with fibroids do not experience obvious symptoms, others suffer from excessive menstrual bleeding, painful periods, bleeding between periods, pelvic pain or fullness, pain during intercourse, and frequent urination.

Aside from the above symptoms of inconvenience and discomfort, fibroids can also interfere with fertility and are the leading cause of hysterectomy (removal of the uterus) in the United States. Milder cases are usually treated with hormone medications and less invasive surgery to control fibroid growth.

Many women prefer to avoid surgery. Dr. Herbert Goldfarb who published the The No-Hysterectomy Option, Your Body Your Choice, in 1990 because most physicians advocated the final solution to most women’s gynecological abnormalities to be hysterectomy. On his website he states, “The sad truth of the matter is that the uterus and pelvic organs are often considered by physicians to be expendable once a woman’s childbearing years are over. The pelvic organs are rarely studied outside the realm of reproduction. Most doctors believe that once a woman has had her children, the uterus and ovaries are then useless and can be removed”.

According to the FDA article entitled Alternatives to Hysterectomy;

      The United States has one of the highest rates of hysterectomy in the world, with about 5 out of every 1,000 women each year having the operation, according to the CDC. Other industrialized countries show lower rates; in England, for example, the rate is less than 3 per 1,000 women annually. In Norway, it’s less than 2 in 1,000. Some are concerned that many hysterectomies are done unnecessarily in this country. “There are some cases where hysterectomy is the only option, for instance, for some types of cancer,” says Anthony Scialli, M.D., director of the obstetrics and gynecology residency program at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington, D.C. “But I think we perform too many hysterectomies. It’s a matter of American gynecologists being accustomed to performing a hysterectomy and American women being accustomed to getting one–based on their mother or other female relative having one. The one thing in favor of a hysterectomy is that it works for abnormal uterine bleeding–but it should be the last step, not the first step.”


Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac. Herbalist

 32 Union Square East, Suite 615N New York, NY 10003

 

 

Stress, Anxiety, & Panic Attack Relief with Acupuncture & Herbs

Woman Sitting with Tea Cup

Anxiety and Panic Attack Treatments with acupuncture and Chinese herbs are fast acting, safe, effective. Chinese medicine recognizes that a variety of causes and conditions continually arise in life which shift our energy. Because of these shifts we may not feel happy all the time, nor are we expected to according to the Chinese medical perspective.

In fact, the person in optimal health will experience the full range of emotions, but without getting stuck in any one emotional state. When stress, anxiety and panic attacks get in the way of life, patients need fast acting treatments. Acupuncture and Chinese herbs offer a natural, safe and effective method of treatment.

In clinical practice, the patients I treat recover quickly from stress, anxiety and panic attack treatments. When I treat people with stress and emotional disorders using acupuncture and Chinese herbs I tailor an individualized and focused treatment strategy to the specific imbalances of each person.

Ready to release the anxiety? Call 646-504-2251 for an appointment.

I gently place acupuncture needles in the body to open up blockages in energy flow, and to support systems that are weak or out of balance with the rest of the body. My approach allows the body to heal itself naturally, and the tailored treatment provides effective. Treatment also aims to resolve the problems from the root cause, for lasting relief. I also teach home care stress reduction techniques.

“After my second appointment with Juliette I never suffered from another anxiety attack again, and it has now been almost a year since I first visited her. I am so grateful to Juliette. I admit I went into this a little skeptical but Juliette Aiyana is so knowledgeable and easy to talk to, as soon as I met her I was immediately glad I made the appointment. Each week I would look forward to my appointment, it was such a relaxing experience. I have such faith in Juliette that I have referred her to friends with various ailments who have also had great results with her. I highly recommend Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac. without reservations.” – Christine READ MORE PATIENT ENDORSEMENTS HERE

 

 Many people are not aware that when stress builds up in their system they experience physical or emotional symptoms. Some symptoms of stress are heart palpitations, muscle tension, headaches, fatigue, or problems with digestion, sleep, memory, or motivation. Sometimes stress or a traumatic event leads to general anxiety or panic attacks.

 

Stress, Anxiety & Emotions

 Emotions only cause imbalance if they are extreme, or if the patient holds on to them for long periods of time. If a person’s body experiences symptoms of imbalance, it means the energy flow is either blocked, deficient, or out of balance. Both physical and emotional wellness depends on a smooth flow of energy throughout the body. Acupuncture and Chinese herbs balance energy by harmonizing the flow the energy, the result of which is smooth flow and thereby reduces and/or eliminates stress, anxiety and panic attacks.

One way to achieve emotional balance is through treatment based on the Chinese Five Element system. Each of the five systems is interrelated, and the health of each one depends on balance between all of them. The five elements are fire, water, wood, metal and earth. Within the elemental relationships, each emotion relates to a specific organ. The five emotions are joy which affects the heart energy, fear/fright which affects the kidney energy, sadness/grief which affect the lung energy, anger/frustration which affects the liver energy, and worry/over-thinking which affects the spleen energy.

Stress, Anxiety & Pain

Physically, stress has several effects on the body. The main problem it causes is stuck or blocked energy, also known as stagnation. When symptoms appear, it signals that energy in one or more pathway is blocked. Some symptoms of qi stagnation are neck and back pain, fatigue, PMS, menstrual cramps or infertility. Over time symptoms become more severe and spread to other systems in the body. Treatment with acupuncture and Chinese herbs will resolve the cause of energetic disharmony to heal the physical symptoms and prevent future disease.

At-Home Stress Relief

 To “wash” your body and mind clean of stress and less than desirable experiences, emotions and events, try the following tips to help bring harmony back to your physical and emotional self, by smoothing out energy flow:

  1. Sitting in a comfortable position, close your eyes and visualize sitting by stream of water flowing gently by. When thoughts come into your head, they are part of the stream, just flowing by you. Allow yourself to consider the thought and then let it go on its way down the stream, not getting caught or lingering too long in your mind.
  2. Breath slowly and deeply. On the inhale, fill your lungs, chest, and belly completely with fresh clean air. On the exhale, release out all the air, along with the tension and built up thoughts and stresses from the day. Oxygen will circulate throughout the lungs and entire body, opening clogged areas and releasing tension from your mind and muscles. Many times during the day we don’t realize how shallowly we have been breathing.
  3. Firmly brush your limbs off, from the trunk of your body outwards. Start at the shoulders and brush out to fingertips, and past them, as if brushing a thick dust off each sleeve. Then, sitting with your legs straight out in front of you, start at the hips and brush all the way down to feet. Energetically, this releases negative or stagnated energy, and refreshes the natural balance of the body, enhancing circulation and washing impurities out of body and mind.

Acupuncture facial rejuvenation

Try Acupuncture & Herbs for Panic Attack Treatments.

It Works!

 

Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac., Herbalist, Author

Stop Your Sniffling: Treat Seasonal Allergies with Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs!

Seasonal Allergies Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs Treatment
Acupuncture, herbs, supplements and diet change treat and prevent allergies

Seasonal Allergies can be put to rest!

Finally, the sun is out and the warm weather upon us. But for roughly 45 million Americans, seasonal allergies (also known as hay fever or allergic rhinitis) make this time of year a miserable one. How can allergy sufferers enjoy themselves with all the sneezing, runny nose, fatigue, sinus pressure, congestion, red itchy eyes, scratchy throat and headache?

Many seasonal allergies sufferers turn to medications throughout the season despite the common side effects of drowsiness, dryness, dizziness, fatigue, insomnia, nervousness, and digestive disturbance. There’s also immune system suppression and the risk of becoming medication-dependent to worry about. Worse still, the Western treatment of allergies treats only the symptoms and not the root cause. Those seeking a natural and effective alternative need search no further than Chinese medicine.

In Chinese medicine the strategy behind treatment is alleviating the acute symptoms as well as correcting the root energetic imbalance causing those symptoms. The symptoms of seasonal allergies are most often related to underlying disharmonies involving wei qi, or defensive energy, phlegm or dampness, and the lung, spleen, and kidney energy systems, all of which I explain below.

Wei Qi and Lung Qi: In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), illness prevention begins with a protective layer around the exterior of the body called wei qi, or defensive energy. A strong and healthy wei qi is the body’s initial protection against all external pathogens. If the defensive energy is weak, “wind pathogens” transmitted through the air will enter the body, so a combination of a wind-born pathogen and a deficiency of the protective wei qi is a recipe for illness. People with wei qi deficiency catch colds easily, and seasonal allergies symptoms may be particularly bad in the spring or fall seasons which are generally windy. Patients with seasonal allergies, chronic cough and/or recurrent colds and flu are also likely to have Lung deficiency, since wei qi and immune function are part of the lung energy. Lung qi controls the domain of skin, lungs, nose, sinuses, and respiratory passages.

Spleen Qi: Behind every weak immune system is a deficiency of the spleen qi, part of the digestive system. It is the job of the spleen to make healthy qi from food. If the spleen qi is weak, it is not able to efficiently digest food and make a healthy quality of energy to distribute to all systems of the body. The immune system suffers. Spleen qi deficiency is usually accompanied by dampness; fluids fail to metabolize and often end up turning to excess phlegm and mucus. Spleen Qi vacuity with Dampness is a common underlying condition with allergy symptoms.

Kidney Qi: Since kidney energy is the root of constitutional and all other energy systems in the body, it is usually related to imbalances involving deficiency. Especially when seasonal allergies, asthma, or frequent or chronic respiratory illness are problems since childhood, the kidney energy must be addressed. It is also important to note that kidney energy is damaged by long-term medication use.

Allergies & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Chinese herbs are very important both for quick relief of the acute symptoms as well as support for the underlyingSeasonal Allergies Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs Treatment imbalance in energy responsible for allergic problems. Though every patient has a unique combination of symptoms and is treated according to their individual pattern, the most common treatment principles are boosting the lung qi, wei qi, and supporting the spleen qi while expelling wind and phlegm dampness from the body.

There are many Chinese herbs that build wei qi and enhance the immune system. For best results (and safety!), herbal formulas should be prescribed only by professionally trained herbalists. The formula prescribed will address each patient’s unique presentation of symptoms, and hence will vary greatly from case to case. However, an example of one of the simplest and most famous formulas is called Jade Windscreen and is comprised of just three immunity-enhancing herbs: Huang qi (Astragalus), Fang feng (Saposhnikovia) and Bai zhu (Atractylodes).

Huang qi (Astragalus) is traditionally used to strengthen wei qi. Modern research has identified several notable pharmacological effects confirming its historical use. Huang qi is an immunostimulant, increasing both specific and non-specific immunity. It also increases the number of white blood cells and has antibiotic actions against streptococcus and staphylococcus. Clinical studies have shown it effective in the prevention of colds and respiratory infections. It is also considered a hepatoprotective (liver-protecting) herb.

Fang feng’s (Saposhnikovia) TCM name is translated to mean “guard against wind,” and it has antibiotic and antiviral properties.

Bai zhu (Atractylodes) is traditionally used as a tonic to build both spleen qi and wei qi. Recent studies have shown that Bai zhu increases the activity of macrophages and increases the number of white blood cells and lymphocytes.

The above herbs are also included in many variations of the original Jade Windscreen formula, such as Allerease by Blue Poppy, which is often relevant and prescribed.

Allergies and Lifestyle: Survival Tips
The following suggestions may help minimize suffering:

  1. Minimize exposure to your allergens. Check your local TV, newspaper or the Internet for pollen forecasts and current pollen levels, and stay indoors when the pollen count or humidity is high. The morning is prime pollen time – especially if it is dry and windy. Plan outdoors activities for later in the day, or after a good rain, when pollen counts are lower.
  2. Keep windows shut when the pollen count is high, including those in your house and car. Use air conditioning if possible, or keep indoor air dry with a dehumidifier. A HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filter or an electrostatic precipitator may also help clean pollen and mold from the indoor air.

  3. Don’t hang laundry outside, since pollen may cling to towels and sheets. Wash all bedding every 7 to 14 days. Also, remove clothes you’ve worn outside and shower to rinse pollen from your skin and hair.
  4. Avoid mowing the grass, pulling weeds or raking leaves. If you must do these, wear a mask to filter pollen and molds from the air.
  5. Plan vacations where pollen isn’t prevalent. A good choice is the beach.
  6. Swim for exercise. In fact, you’ll find one of the purest concentrations of air in the ten to 15 inch layer right above the water, and the gentle humidity keeps your airways from drying out. If you exercise outdoors, use a neti pot before and after exercising to get rid of dust, pollen, and mucus from your nose.
Seasonal Allergies Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs Treatment
Chinese herbal medicine & other natural supplements are very effective for allergies

Diet and Supplements for Allergy Season
In general, eating a well-balanced healthy diet will keep the immune system strong. Specifically, minimize or avoid cows milk and other dairy products as they contribute to the production of phlegm and mucus. Overindulgence in simple carbohydrates and sweets can also contribute to allergies, since they harm the spleen qi.

Include both omega-3 and omega-6s fatty acids included in salmon, tuna, mackerel, and other cold-water fish. Eat mercury containing fish, such as tuna, in moderation especially pregnant women. Check the USDA Website for more information on mercury and fish. Flax seeds, hemp seeds, walnuts, and canola oil are high in alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), which the body converts to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), the form found in fish.

Another article about Natural Allergy Control gives more suggestions about diet and supplements that may be helpful. It also explains how allergies are related to imbalances in the nervous system, and which allergies respond well to chiropractic care.

Prevention is the Best Medicine

The best time to get treated for seasonal allergies is before they show up. Starting a treatment program including acupuncture and Chinese herbs 6-8 weeks before they typically start for you, helps boost the immune system and hence prevent symptoms from appearing since the underlying energy will be strong and resilient. However, if allergy symptoms are already bothering you, start treatment as soon as possible for best results.

Contact Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs for more information or to make an appointment today!

646-504-2251

Seasonal Allergies Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs Treatment

Endometriosis Treatment with Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs

Endometriosis Treatment with Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Therapy

It is safe and effective, learn more below…

Endometriosis is a condition suffered by women of reproductive age and affects an estimated 89 million women around the world, regardless of background or race–Learn more about Endometriosis Treatment with Acupuncture. The word endometriosis is derived from the word “endometrium,” which is the lining inside of a woman’s uterus. The uterine endometrium (sometimes called endometrial tissue or lining) is normally shed during each menstrual period. Every month when a woman has her menstrual period, if the ovulated egg is not fertilized, the endometrial tissue along with blood and the unfertilized egg are shed from the uterus resulting in menstruation. Endometriosis Treatment with Acupuncture and Chinese herbs are a safe and effective natural treatment for endometriosis.

With woman suffering from endometriosis, the endometrial tissue normally found in the uterus is also present on the outside of the uterus, in the pelvic cavity. The endometrial tissue outside the uterus responds to the hormonal changes that occur each menstrual month in women but unlike the uterine endometrial lining, this tissue is not expelled from the body during menstruation. Instead, the endometrial tissue lingers and is slowly absorbed into the body which then inflames the surrounding tissues.

Women with endometriosis usually experiences lower abdominal pain 5-7 days before menstruation, during menstruation or with ovulation. Many women who are suffering from endometriosis experience irregular menstruation with excessive bleeding and clotting during their menses, low back pain, nausea, vomiting,intestinal upsets, fatigue, pain with sexual intercourse, discomfort with urination or bowel movements, and infertility. It is estimated that 30 to 40 percent of women who report infertility problems have endometriosis.

After undergoing two pelvic surgeries that led to adhesions which caused more pain than the fibroid or endometriosis I had the surgeries for, I was despondent. Pain medication left me unable to function during the day and the alternatives the medical community offered me: a hysterectomy, nerve blocks or hormones, held no guarantees, had risks and were just unacceptable to me. My personality changed as I was in constant, unrelenting pain.

The only relief I had was the sleep I feel in to every night after taking prescription pain killers. I stopped making plans with friends, did not want to socialize and just counted the hours until I could medicate and go to sleep. One day, I was on an endometriosis website and one of the bloggers was singing the praises of acupuncture. I decided I had nothing to lose and found Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac., Herbalist in her NYC office. At my first appointment I told her that I was just looking for relief, not a cure, and while she made no promises Juliette made it clear that her goal was to cure me of all pain. I knew then how serious, professional, caring and dedicated she is.

With acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, supplements such as fish oils and B-complex, and heat lamp therapy, Juliette Aiyana, has literally given me my life back and she achieved her goal; I am pain free. I continue to see Juliette pro-actively, although I can honestly state that I was “cured” after about two months of treatment. I don’t like to think about what would have happened to me if I had not found Juliette”. – Caroline, Age 47.

Read more success stories from Juliette Aiyana’s patients.

 

Call 646-504-2251 for an appointment.

Western Diagnosis and Treatment

Although the causes of endometriosis remain unknown, several different theories have been put forward as to what the cause(s) may be. The most commonly accepted theory is retrograde menstruation, also known as “backward menstruation.” Normally during the menses the menstrual blood is shed and comes out. In some women, a small amount of blood flows backwards down the fallopian tubes and into the pelvic cavity. This blood contains cells from the uterine lining (endometrium). It is not known why in some women this might implant and lead to endometriosis, it may have something to do with a particular woman’s immune response and ability to fight off and remove these cells. Another theory suggests that endometrial tissue is distributed from the uterus to other parts of the body through the lymphatic system or through the blood system. A genetic theory suggests that it may be carried in the genes in certain families or that some families may have predisposing factors. If your mother or sister has endometriosis, you are six times more likely to get the disease than other women.

The Western diagnosis and treatment for this condition are invasive and include surgery and drug therapy. A laparoscopy or laparotomy is usually performed to diagnose the condition. For laparoscopy surgery, a lighted optical tube is inserted through a small incision in the navel, and is often referred to as “bellybutton surgery.” Laparotomy is a more extensive procedure where there is a full incision and a longer recovery period. Radical surgery, which may be necessary in severe cases, involves hysterectomy, removal of all growths, and removal of ovaries.

 

Eastern Endometriosis Treatment with Acupuncture and Diagnosis
In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), groups of symptoms, or syndromes, are typically classified into patterns that involve the internal organs and/or energy pathways of the body. In TCM, the primary pattern or mechanism which causes endometriosis is Blood stagnation.

If there is a free flow of qi and blood, there will be no pain, but if there is no free flow of qi and blood, there will be pain.

This means that if the blood and qi are stagnant and not flowing freely (specifically in lower abdominal region), there will be pain.

Spleen qi deficiency and blood stasis: The cause of this pattern is chronic illness or constitutional weakness. Some of the signs and symptoms of this pattern include lower abdominal pain, fatigue, abdominal tenderness that may feel better with pressure, pain during or after periods, preference for warmth, prolapsed bearing down feeling in the uterus, a feeling of anxiousness and worry, loose or soft bowel movements, bruising easily, pale complexion, menstrual periods that are either heavy or scanty and contain blood clots, thick-pale tongue body with tooth-marks on the sides and visible red dots, and a thin-wiry or weak pulse.Blood stagnation can be caused by emotional disturbance, chronic illness, exposure to cold temperatures, surgery, and genital infections. Although blood stasis is the primary pattern in endometriosis, it is often combined with other patterns such as spleen qi deficiency, kidney deficiency, liver qi stagnation, cold stagnation or heat obstruction. The TCM diagnosis is differentiated based on the clinical manifestations associated with each case of endometriosis. The timing, location, nature, and severity of pain are taken into account, along with associated symptoms. The following syndromes are the most commonly seen patterns in women who are suffering from endometriosis:

Liver qi stagnation and blood stasis: The cause of this pattern lies in emotional stress and anxiety. Some of the signs and symptoms include severe lower abdominal pain, abdominal tenderness with an aversion to pressure, breast distention and tenderness before periods, feeling of frustration, distending pain under the rib cage, aversion to pressure on the abdomen, bitter taste in the mouth, menstrual periods that contain a lot of blood clots, menstrual pain relieved after the periods, a dark purple tongue with red spots, and a wiry-choppy pulse.Kidney deficiency and blood stasis: The cause of this pattern is either a constitutional weakness, or a history of surgical procedures. Some of the signs and symptoms of this pattern include lower abdominal pain, lower back weakness and aches, sore knees, fearfulness, ringing in the ears, a feeling of pressure and pain during or after menstrual periods, dizziness, irregular periods, scanty periods or spotting that include blood clots, a history of infertility or habitual miscarriage, a pale tongue color that has red spots, and a deep-thin-choppy pulse.

Cold stagnation and blood stasis: The cause of this pattern is a history of exposure to cold – either cold temperatures (externally), or the chronic consumption of cold foods (internally), especially during menstruation. Some of the signs and symptoms of this pattern include lower abdominal pain and tenderness, pressure and pain before or during periods with a preference for warmth, an aversion to cold, watery menstrual period with blood clots, menstrual pain relieved after the periods, nausea, loose stools, pale complexion, a pale, bluish/purplish tongue with red spots, and a wiry-tight pulse

Heat obstruction and blood stasis: The cause of this pattern is a history of genital infections (in TCM this is considered to be an accumulation of heat toxins in the body). Some of the signs and symptoms of this pattern are, lower abdominal pain and tenderness that are worse with pressure, a fever before, during, or after periods, preference for cold temperatures and foods, bitter taste in the mouth, dry throat, feeling of frustration, constipation, pain during intercourse, a red tongue with red or purple spots, and wiry-rapid pulse.

We advise you to come into the clinic 1 – 2 times per week for acupuncture and will usually combine a Chinese herbal formula for you to take as well. Effectively treating the root cause of endometriosis takes approximately three menstrual cycles. Some women will see a reduction in their symptoms right away while others may take a longer period of time. Stress levels, lifestyle, and general health are important factors involved in response time.It is important to note that most women suffering from endometriosis have more than one pattern diagnosis, therefore you may have symptoms from one or all patterns described above.

 

 

 

Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac. Herbalist

If you like this article
you might also like:



The Magic of Moxabustion

Moxa stick therapy

Moxa, also known as Mugwort in English and Artemesia Vulgaris in Latin, is a very special Chinese herb which is applied externally and sometimes decocted as a tea to be taken internally. With a unique spongy texture and a long history of medical use, moxa is one of the highlights of Chinese Medicine! This article will focus on its external use.

The Chinese word “zhenjiu” — which is now translated as “acupuncture” — actually describes the combination of acupuncture with moxibustion, or moxa-burning. The two techniques used to be understood as two essential parts of one fundamental approach to treating disease and maintaining health. In modern American acupuncture clinics, moxa is used very frequently but still gets far less media attention than acupuncture.
There are a variety of methods for the practice of moxibustion depending on the style of treatment and the condition of the patient. Traditionally, small amounts of the herb are burned directly on the skin, but we at Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs use indirect moxibustion style. Practitioners often use cigar or pole, platform, or herb insulated moxibustion.  In my clinic To protect my own health, I avoid inhaling the thick smoke of regular moxibustion by mainly using a smokeless moxa pole, which is a rod of charcoal impregnated with moxa. The ignited pole is held above the point or area being treated, and does not come into contact with the skin. The patient experiences a warming sensation and reports feeling very comfortable and relaxed during the treatment.

 

Moxabustion is useful for a variety of conditions.

Pain: One of moxa’s active components, borneol, is commonly used in topical therapies for its antiseptic and analgesic effects.

  • Arthritis and other painful joint conditions
  • Tendonitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, or repetitive strain injuries
  • Sprains and Strains: Speeds healing of damaged tissue
  • Muscle tension or stiffness: moxa relaxes tension and increases circulation
  • Decrease swelling and inflammation
  • Read more about pain treatment at Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs

Reproductive: Research has shown that moxa acts as an agent that increases blood circulation to the pelvic area and uterus and regulates menstruation.

  • Menstrual cramps and pelvic inflammatory disease
  • Enhance fertility via increased circulation of blood to uterus
  • Turn breech babies to a normal position
  • Reduce the intensity and duration of labor pains
  • Labor induction

General:

  • Reduce the appearance of old scars
  • Boost immune system for cold and flu treatment and prevention
  • Chronic autoimmune-related illness
  • Open bronchial airways for asthma
  • Digestive disorders such as IBS and diarrhea
  • Gastric, abdominal, or intestinal pains
  • Fatigue

A few more bonus points for moxa:

  1. It can be used for treating children or those who are severely needle-phobic. Treating acupuncture points with moxa alone can gently stimulate the action of the point just through the heat and energy from moxa itself.
  2. In my personal clinical experience I have observed that moxa treatment used in combination with acupuncture often allows patients to enter a more relaxed state of rest than just acupuncture treatment alone. Within the first few minutes of moxibustion, I notice that my patients’ breathing becomes much deeper and slower as their body and mind let go of pent-up tension.
  3. Aside from being useful to treat the above conditions and as a preventative measure to maintain health, moxa has been known throughout the ages as an agent that can prolong life! Its famous reputation for promoting longevity goes back to ancient classic Chinese Medical texts.
Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs
32 Union Square East, Suite 615N
New York, NY 10003
646-504-2251

What is Qi?

Qi

What is Qi?

Is Qi energy? Those who are fatigued, or always tired, will be particularly interested in Chinese Medicine’s views on qi.

This is one of the most common questions Americans ask about Chinese Medicine, and not an easy one to answer. Qi (pronounced “chee” and sometimes spelled ‘chi’) is possibly the most essential and the most controversial aspect of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Biomedicine often feels it can quite easily dismiss parts or all of TCM by maintaining that modern science cannot verify the existence of qi. The false idea that qi is an ‘energy’ like electricity has worsened this controversy.

Is Qi Energy?

Some TCM practitioners say qi is ‘energy.’ This is not too bad of an explanation. But don’t go away thinking we believe there are electrical circuits running through your body! Some scholars (D.E. Kendall, and Paul Unschuld) maintain that the idea of qi as ‘energy’ was a mistranslation from the Chinese.

Then What is It?

In terms of basic TCM ontology (“what exists”), Qi is one of the four basic constituents of the body:

Yin Blood Qi Yang
< — Substance Function — >
< — Cold Hot — >

Consider this convenient car-engine analogy: Yin is water from the radiator to cool the engine, blood is oil, qi is the force that moves the pistons, and the engine can be said to be in a yang state when operating. Perhaps the explosion itself is yang, while the force of the explosion is qi. We can also say that the gas contains a qi that has yet to be utilized.

(In the actual chinese character for the word, qi is the steam rising from a cooking pot of rice. I hope that explanation made sense to ancient Chinese, because it doesn’t make much to me! To be fair to the ancient chinese, we can think of the steam coming from the rice as being less substantial, more yang than the rice itself, but still…)

What Happens Without Qi?

Another way to understand things is by their absence (darkness is defined as the absence of light). Without sufficient qi,

  • your digestive system cannot break down food or transport nutrients to the rest of your body
  • you become easily fatigued and are always tired
  • you lose your appetite
  • your limbs are heavy
  • you might wake up frequently at night because you need to urinate
  • academic/organizing thought is difficult or impossible
  • everything is overwhelming (you cannot ‘digest’ what is going on)
  • you tend to worry (the emotional component – TCM is a holistic medicine that does not separate body and mind)

How Do I Get More Qi?

  • The proper diet goes a long way. TCM dietary principles are too complex to cover here (I must say though that it is surprising to many patients, perhaps because vegetarianism is thought to be synonymous with alternative medicine, that TCM advocates eating meat and mostly cooked foods).
  • Herbs that increase the qi include ginseng, and codonopsis.
  • Avoid activities that drain the qi – Be sensible about your energy expenditure by living a balanced life; don’t be too sedentary or too active. If you are a couch potato, your qi can’t flow without exercise. If you are a type-A personality, relax and don’t use yourself up too early in life – you may live to regret it!
by Brian B. Carter, MS, LAc. Reprinted with permission by the author
Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac., Herbalist, Author, Creator of HealthyStuffU.com
Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs
32 Union Square East, Suite 615N
New York, NY 10003
(646) 504.2251

 

Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs for Skin Conditions: Eczema, Psoriasis, Acne, Dermatitis, Dry or Itchy Skin

Young happy woman in warm sweater drinking a cup of hot teaYour skin is one of the most vulnerable organs of your body. Though seldom life threatening, skin disorders can be very uncomfortable and may cause chronic disabilities. In addition, because skin is so visible, skin disorders can lead to psychological stress.

Skin problems, which affect more than 10 million Americans, can be one of the most frustrating and stubborn group of symptoms to successfully treat. Many pharmaceutical solutions offer quick relief but do not provide a lasting solution, and come with risks such as toxic build-up in the body and weakening of other organ systems. More and more people are choosing alternative solutions, which are safer and which address the root cause of the symptom instead of covering it up each time it re-appears.

Q: Is Chinese Medicine effective for treating Skin Disorders?
A: Yes. In fact, dermatology is a recognized specialty in traditional Chinese Medicine. Treatments for skin disorders have beenAcupuncture & Chinese Herbs Skin Conditions Treatment described as early as 1100-221 BC in China. Juliette Aiyana is one of the few Chinese medicine dermatologists in the United States. Read HERE about her treatment program for patients.

Throughout the United States today, many patients are frustrated with stubborn skin conditions that are not satisfactorily treated using Western medications, or they find that results do not last consistently. Acupuncture and Chinese herbs offer a natural solution to improving skin conditions.

Q: What types of skin conditions can Acupuncture , Chinese Herbs and Chinese dietary therapy treat?
A: The most common skin conditions treated are acne, rosacea, dermatitis, eczema, psoriasis, hives/urticaria and dry or itchy skin.

 “I had never had acupuncture before, but when my skin disease Pityriasis rosea lasted longer than 8 weeks, I decided to give Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac., Herbalist a try. I went in with red, itchy, swollen skin patches all over my body, and left three weeks later with my skin looking almost back to perfect. As a 22 year old female, in the summer time, this skin virus was a real downer and Juliette helped me gain my skin, and confidence back. Acupuncture works, and I will definitely be back”. – Jessica   

Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs Skin Conditions Treatment

Q: According to Chinese Medicine, what causes skin conditions?
A: In Traditional Chinese Medicine, the body is a whole system of interconnected parts. Although skin problems manifest externally, their root causes are often complex, and involve internal imbalances between qi, blood, yin, yang, and different energetic systems of the body. Usually the pathology involves a combination of internal imbalances and external pathological environmental factors.

Internal imbalances include; a weak immune system, digestive disorders, poor diet, unbalanced lifestyle, stress, genetic constitution, and unbalanced emotions. Pathological external environmental factors are often weather related and which invade the body causing symptoms to appear on the skin.

Examples of recognized environmental factors involved in skin conditions are as follows. These aspects of diagnosis are often seen in combination with each other.

 

Acupuncture Skin Diseases Treatment
Get the itch out! Try acupuncture & herbs! Call 646-504-2251

Heat: characterized by appearance of redness, burning or heat sensation, and symptom worsens with alcohol, anger/stress, hot/spicy food, and hot weather.

Wind: characterized by quick onset, and movement of symptoms to different areas of the body, itchiness, and aversion to wind.

Damp: characterized by oozing or weeping conditions, feeling of body heaviness. Dampness can also be an internally generated factor worsened by eating rich, oily or dairy foods.

Dry: characterized by scaly itchy skin which is worse in dry, winter or autumn weather.

Cold: characterized by open sores, purplish color, wet discharge and slow healing, and usually a chronic condition.

Q: How is the imbalance analyzed?

A: Important factors are considered before making each individual diagnosis and treatment plan. Aside from careful inspection of the exterior skin condition, relevant information includes the type of eruption, color, temperature, foods, activities, climates or emotions that affect the symptoms, details about onset, duration and frequency of the problem, along with any other signs in the body including digestion, energy, emotions, sleep, and immune system.

Q: How are skin conditions treated?
A: Each condition for each individual patient is unique, and is treated as such. It is usually very important to use Chinese herbs daily, taken internally along with topically applied liniments, with acupuncture. In addition, dietary changes are often recommended, since metabolism of certain food can contribute to skin conditions. Learn More About Juliette Aiyana’s Dermatology Practice HERE.

An example of how Chinese Medicine would treat eczema is by:

  1. Strengthening the immune system, thereby decreasing sensitivity to external or environmental hazards
  2. Balancing the internal organ systems and treating the internal imbalances that are contributing to or causing eczema
  3. Releasing toxins from the skin, thereby eliminating the itchy, red rash
  4. Building the yin and blood, which help nourish and repair damaged skin
Acupuncture Skin Diseases Treatment
Common Sites of Eczema in kids and adults

 

Q: How long does it take to get results?
A: The amount of time it takes for skin conditions to resolve varies depending on duration and severity of the condition. In general, results are sometimes noticed as early as one week into treatment, but often take several months to clear up significantly. This is because it takes longer to balance the body from the inside out, rather than just address the problem topically or temporarily. However, the treatment of the whole body, rather than just the skin, is the key to eliminating the problem and not just covering it up. According to Chinese medicine, when a chronic condition has settled in the skin, it is an indication that the person’s general health has been compromised for quite a long time.

Treating skin conditions with Chinese medicine is well worth the time and patience it requires. A healthy balanced body is significantly less likely to have a recurrence of the skin condition.

 

Acupuncture Skin Diseases Treatment

Q: Where can I get more information and treatment?
A:  Call 646-504-2251

And READ MORE HERE

Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac., Herbalist, Author

Natural Support for Hashimoto’s Thyroid Disease with Acupuncture, Chinese Herbs, Food, Vitamins and Self-Care

How Acupuncture, Chinese Medicine, Diet, Exercise and Supplements
Can Help Manage This Auto-Immune Disorder

Stay warm!

Hashimoto’s disease effects women eight times more often than men. Clinically, the thyroid is enlarged, accompanied by hypothyroidism. The typical medical treatment is lifelong administration of a thyroid hormone.

Patients diagnosed with Hashimoto’s complain that they are extremely fatigued, suffer from a cold body, many have chronic joint pain or inflammation; sometimes they even have numbness and tingling in the hands and feet. Some present with allergies to food such as wheat or airborne allergens. In my practice, it seems the severity of complicating symptoms exacerbate with age.

How Can Chinese Medicine Help You?

Chinese Medicine treats the root cause of disharmony in your body. During the first visit with your practitioner, she will take an extensive health history and use techniques called Tongue Diagnosis and Pulse Diagnosis. She will connect all of the information she has gathered into a “pattern differentiation”.

Basically, what that means is she finds your unique pattern of energetic disharmony and treats that instead of administering one cookbook treatment for every patient with the same disease.

It is said in Chinese Medicine, “Same Disease, Different Treatment. Different Disease, Same Treatment”. In other words, your treatment is based upon specific Chinese medical methodology to create an individualized treatment plan for each patient. Chinese Medicine works so effectively because your practitioner acknowledges that you are not merely your disease.

So unlike western medicine which gives all Hashimoto’s patients the same treatment, practitioners of Chinese medicine will design a unique Chinese herbal medicine and acupuncture treatment protocol especially for you.

How Many Treatments Will You Need?

Treatments for auto-immune disorders are ongoing. At first you may go to your practitioner every week for about 3 months. Then you and your practitioner will decide the best treatment plan for you.

Auto-immune disorders are chronic; therefore, acupuncture and Chinese herbal therapies can be used to support your health and energy throughout your life especially in times of stress.

I teach my patients the self care techniques listed below so that we can create a healing partnership and so they can take care of themselves on a daily basis.

 

Call Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs in NYC for an appointment: 646-504-2251

Not in NYC? Schedule a Skype Wellness Consultation: 646-504-2251

 

Self-Care Techniques and Home Remedies For Patients with Hashimoto’s Thyroid Disease:

  1. Diet Adjustments
    Eat cooked leafy greens, black beans, yellow squash, meat and meat broths for blood vacuity. Patients with blood vacuity are often cold, experience fatigue, have dry skin, hair and nails and possible scant menstruation, skipped, late or missed periods.

    Essential fatty acids reduce inflammation

    Therefore blood supplementation is important for Hashimoto’s patients. Eat almonds, walnuts, sunflower seeds and avocado for essential fatty acids which reduce joint inflammation and are shown to level out blood glucose levels. Avoid white refined flour and sugars. Eat whole grains and rice instead.  Special attention should be paid to your Spleen Qi. The Spleen produces qi, blood and body fluids essential to health.

  2. Supplements
    Take a complete whole foods based multi-vitamin daily and a Calcium- Magnesium blend the ratio of which should be two times the amount of Calcium to Magnesium. Choose the bio-avilable form of calcium; citrate or citrate/malate.  Essential Fatty Acids (EFA’s) found in fish oils especially Omega 3’s reduce joint inflammation. EFA’s can be found in flax seed oil, hemp seed oil and evening primrose oil, fatty fish oils, nuts, seeds and avocado. Vitamin D3 aids thyroid function. Selenium level are usually extremely low for patient with thyroid dysfunction yet it is important for thyroid health.   Join our e-mail list to gain access to 15% all supplements via our online ordering system, wellevate, every time you order.
  3. Exercise Regularly
    If you feel more energized after exercise keep it up, but if you feel drained try a different form of exercise which consume less energy like simply walking everyday. Exercise will help you feel warmer and reduces stress. Yoga, tai-chi and qi-gong build energy and help many people feel relaxed and centered. In the case of my 25 year old patient, she can work out several times a week, and feel energetic after. But when she stops her routine, fatigue worsens, and it is hard for her to get back into the routine because of the increased fatigue. So maintain a regular program even if that simply means you walk 20 minutes a day.
  4. Dress Warmly
  5. Reduce Stress
    Keep your immune system strong by managing stress. Stress creates over-thinking and worry depleting the Spleen qi. The Spleen transforms and transports food energy into qi, blood and body fluids necessary for balance. Anger, resentment, unfulfilled desires and emotional depression can further stagnate Liver Qi energy. The Liver is responsible for the smooth flow of energy for the whole body so it is important to keep it healthy. Expressing feelings in discussions and in writing can be very helpful. Avoid people who usurp your energy. Strengthen your support system of friends and family. Avoid overworking.
    Get enough sleep. Some people find that mediation or prayer is helpful or qi cultivation/relaxation exercises such as yoga, tai chi or qi gong. Seek professional care from a therapist or support group if needed. Make choices that nourish your spirit.
  6. Acupuncture and Chinese Herbal Medicine. TCM offers herbs which help to warm the body, reduce or eliminate pain, and increase energy.  Acupuncture treats pain, relaxes the mind and body and reduces stress.

Special Note: Women who take thyroid medication have a higher incidence of Osteoporosis. That is why it is very important for them to take a calcium supplement 500-1000 mg/daily along with a blend of co-factors that aid the absorption of calcium such as boron, K2, and Vitamin D3,  eat lots of leafy green veggies and participate in weight bearing exercise regularly. In Chinese medicine it is the Kidney qi energy that nourishes the bones and marrow. So by eating well and exercising, you can supplement the Kidney energy. You can also supplement the Kidney qi with acupuncture and Chinese herbs.

Call Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs in NYC for an appointment: 646-504-2251 Not in NYC? Schedule a Skype Wellness Consultation: 646-504-2251

 

Juliette Aiyana, L.Ac., Herbalist, Author, Creator of HealthyStuffU.com
Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs
32 Union Square East, Suite 615N
New York, NY 10003
(646)-504-2251